Fall 2021 Course Descriptions: Hartford Campus

Fall 2021


Each semester the faculty for the Department of English provide course descriptions that build upon the University's catalog descriptions. These individually crafted descriptions provide information about variable topics, authors, novels, texts, writing assignments, and whether instructor consent is required to enroll. The details, along with reviewing the advising report, will help students select course options that best meet one's interests and academic requirements.

The following list includes Undergraduate courses that are sequenced after the First-Year Writing requirement and will change each semester.

1000-Level Courses

1616W: Major Works of English and American Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.


1616W | MWF 11:15-12:05 | Kneidel, Gregory

This is a law and literature-themed, W-course. Literary readings will be supplemented by a robust selection of legal-themed podcasts, as well as by writing assignments from our primary writing guide, They Say / I Say. Possible literary readings include Tony Kushner’s Angels in America, Natasha Trethewey Bellocq’s OpheliaMiné Okobo’s Citizen 13660, and Moshin Hamid’s How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia; we will also try to visit the Wadsworth Atheneum or other Hartford-area cultural institutions and discuss some law-related podcasts. Ideally, in this hybrid course, Monday and Wednesday classes will be in-person, and Friday class will be online. Requirements include four essays (with drafts and revisions), as well as quizzes and active and informed class participation. Fulfills: GEOC CA1 and W-requirement.

1616W | MW 4:40 - 5:55 | Duni, Michael

During this semester we shall concern ourselves with selected works by both English and American writers. Authors have attempted to share their perceptions of the world and how it works. Consequently, the representations of man and his world according to various writers prove as varied as does each one of our descriptive explanations of our world. We shall examine major authors including Chaucer, Donne, Wordsworth, Emily Bronte, Dickens, E.M. Forster, Hawthorne, Crane, Tennessee Williams, Michael Chabon, and Justin Torres to encounter each writer’s configuration of the world and what he or she has to say about it. In this way, our understanding of how the world might work and how man may fit into this world will become enhanced, if not further complicated! Beware: You are expected to read voraciously.

I have chosen works that I like and that I believe prove provocative. Provocative in that they offer suggestions about themes in life as well as insights about the characters and the authors of these characters. I feel that these works will say something about each one of us as well. Yes. We read about others so as to discover truths about ourselves. What might each work say about you?!

Along with our perusals and close examinations of these works, our composition tasks will become effective exercises for the expression of this enhancement or confusion. As authors offer their arguments, you will share your reactions, impressions, and further contributions regarding these literary works and their messages in written responses and academic essays. Writing is a required and crucial component of this course. We shall gather on Mondays and Wednesdays at 4:40 p.m. until 5:55 p.m.

2000-Level Courses

2101: British Literature II

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.


2101 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Shea, Tom

This survey of British Literature from 1800 through the Present, will take us on an extensive tour through the last 200+ years of Britain’s finest writing. We will begin with the Romantic Movement of the early 19th century, proceed through the Victorians, meet the Edwardians, engage the Modernists & Post Modernists, and conclude with Contemporary authors of the 21st century.

We will also take full advantage of the Wadsworth Atheneum, exploring links between British Literature and the various artistic masterpieces one-half block away.

Course grades will be based on class participation--40% of your semester grade, occasional brief writings, a mid-term essay, and a medium-length final essay.

Usually, NO FINAL EXAM.

Freshmen Through Seniors Welcome: Email Thomas.Shea@uconn.edu for a permission number if needed.

2200: Literature and Culture of North America Before 1800

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.


2200 | MWF 1:25-2:15 | Kneidel, Gregory

An examination of the early written and oral culture of the area that eventually became the United States. Readings will hopefully be coordinated with events and performances at Hartford-area cultural institutions. Ideally, in this hybrid course, Monday and Wednesday classes will be in-person, and Friday class will be online.  Assessments will include two short papers, one longer paper, and informed class participation. Fulfills: GEOC CA 1.

2274W: Disability in American Literature and Culture

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.


2274W | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Horn, Jacob

Relying on fiction, non-fiction, and academic essays exploring the representation of disability in cultural texts, this class will interrogate dominant narratives of disability by recognizing the negative stereotypes and narrative tropes that accompany disability in both the written word and visual media. Students will be expected to explore complex ideas in writing and use composition as a process of discovery and exploration. Two major papers and a multimodal project will compose the primary work of the semester, alongside shorter writing assignments and regular participation. 

2407: The Short Story

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.


2407 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Shea, Tom 

This course in the Short Story will center on a nexus of three valences:

- CSI Detective thinking via authors such as Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes), and Eilis Ni Dhuibhne.

- Diverse, International authors (e.g. Polish, British, Indian, Irish, American).

- Collections of short stories as coherent, organic wholes (e.g. James Joyce’s Dubliners, Ernest Hemingway’s In Our Time).

We will also take full advantage of the Wadsworth Atheneum, exploring links between our short stories and the various artistic masterpieces one-half block away.

Course grades will be based on class participation--40% of your semester grade, occasional brief writings, a mid-term essay, and a medium-length final essay.

Usually, NO FINAL EXAM.

Freshmen Through Seniors Welcome: Email Thomas.Shea@uconn.edu for a permission number if needed.

3000-Level Courses

3265W: American Studies Methods

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.


3265W | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Horn, Jacob

African American Science Fiction & Fantasy

Exploring the African American participation in science fiction and fantasy in the 20th and 21st century, the class will explore music, film, and the written word in an attempt to come to deeper understanding of the role that genre fiction plays in African American narrative. Students will be expected to engage with complex questions of race and its relationship to genre fiction as well as to perform some research in the writing of one or two major projects. A multimodal project and some shorter writing will accompany regular participation throughout the semester. 

4000-Level Courses

4203W: Advanced Study: Ethnic Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; at least 12 credits of 2000-level or above English courses or consent of instructor; open to juniors or higher.


4203W | Tu 4:00-6:30 | Campbell, Scott 

This section of ENGL 4203W, subtitled Blutopias and Freedom Dreams, explores the work of Black American writers and musicians in and around the Black Power movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. These are artists who sought ways to give voice, often literally, to expressions of freedom that would challenge and maybe topple the systemic racism of post-WWII America, and their work still resonates in today’s movements for social justice and systemic change. In the course, we’ll examine controversies around “out” or “free” music and look into the relationships between writing, sound, and community. The course is organized around various sites of real and imagined Black experience, including Harlem, Chicago, Nation Time, Outer Space, and Memphis. We’ll touch on or examine work by James Baldwin, Max Roach and Abbey Lincoln, June Jordan, Amiri Baraka, Sun Ra, Nina Simone, John and Alice Coltrane, George Lewis, Curtis Mayfield, The Art Ensemble of Chicago, Anthony Braxton, Jimi Hendrix, Ming Smith, Matana Roberts, and more. 

Expect frequent writing assignments. Two more substantial projects will go through proposal, draft, and revision stages. The course meets once per week to make the course more accessible to students from other campuses. Please contact Professor Campbell with any questions: scott.campbell@uconn.edu