Course Descriptions: Stamford Campus

Fall 2020


General Information:

For guidance about courses, majors, and minors, contact any English faculty member or Professor Roden, Curriculum Coordinator, at frederick.roden@uconn.edu or Inda Watrous, English Undergraduate Advisor, at inda.watrous@uconn.edu.

Special Announcement:

Professor Roden will be on sabbatical in Fall 2020. He will be available to his advisees and students and for special issues.  In general, routine matters of inquiry should be addressed to other faculty and staff, including Ms. Watrous.

 

Helpful Information for Non-Majors

  • Most 1000-level courses do not count toward the English major but are terrific introductions to literary study and typically serve General Education Category 1b or 4.
  • If you think you might be interested in an English major, try out a course; if you know you’re set on the major, plan on taking English 2600 as early as possible.
  • Non-majors are welcome in advanced courses. Check your preparedness with an instructor before registering if you have questions. Following completion of the English 1010/1011 First-Year Writing requirement, upper-level courses are open to all students. If you encounter difficulty in registering, contact the instructor or Professor Roden.
  • The English minor is highly recommended and easy to accomplish: English 2100 or 2101; 2201 or 2203; and your choice of almost any 3 upper-level courses. See the Minoring in English page for more information.
  • Remember that English courses make great “related field” classes for many other majors. Check with your major advisor for appropriateness of choices.

Helpful Information for Majors and Minors

  • English 2600 (Requirement A) is offered annually in the Fall semester.
  • A Major Author course (Requirement D) is offered annually or every third semester.
  • An Advanced Study course (Requirement E) is typically offered every third semester. This semester, we are offering English 4201W.
    • If you expect to graduate in Fall 2020, Spring 2021, or Fall 2021 and have not yet met this requirement, you must take English 4201W or risk delaying graduation. 
  • We offer at least one pre-1800 course each semester. This semester, we are offering English 3113W. All plans of study require two pre-1800 classes. Check with your advisor or the coordinator if you have questions.
  • We offer a variety of survey and methods courses each semester. This term, the Major Requirement B1 course that we are offering is English 3113W. For Major Requirement C, we are offering English 2401, 2408, and 2409.
    • Check your catalog year to determine which Plan of Study you should refer to. In catalog years 2008 - 2014, English 3003W and 3613 fulfill Requirement C (Methods). In later years, these courses fulfill Requirement F (Elective Courses).
    • Catalog years prior to 2017 limit the number of Advanced Composition or Creative Writing courses that can count towards the major.
  • Catalog years prior to 2015 allow for 6 elective credits (Requirement F). Later catalog years allow for 9 elective credits. Courses that meet a requirement that you have already satisfied can count as Elective Courses. You are able to change your catalog year to have more flexibility to enroll in courses that you may be interested in.

Optional Concentrations

The Stamford Campus offers the Concentration in Teaching English and the Concentration in Creative Writing as part of the major. These can typically be obtained by taking five courses that already count for your major.

This semester, we are offering several courses that count towards each concentration:

  • Teaching in English: English 1701, 2401, 2408, 2409, and 3003W
  • Creative Writing: English 1601W, 3003W, and 3613

If you are interested in a concentration, consult your advisor and review the courses list, as you may have already met requirements. These include Linguistics 2010W (The Science of Linguistics), a Q course that can serve as a Related Field class for the English major.

For more information, contact Professor Roden or Inda Watrous, Undergraduate Advisor for English.

1000-Level Courses

1601W: Race, Gender, and the Culture Industry

This course satisfies the following:

  • General Education Requirements: Content Area Four (USA) and one Writing Competency course
  • Meets the Multicultural Literature requirement for the Concentration in Teaching English

1601W |  TuTh 11:00 - 12:30 | Pierrot, Gregory

Race in Space: Blackness in Science Fiction

Abduction, displacement and alien-nations have long been the stuff of Science Fiction; they have also defined the black experience in the New World. Space is the place, said Sun Ra, and he would have known: though officially born in Mississippi, the jazz maverick claimed he was an alien from Saturn. In his 1974 feature film Space is the Place, Sun Ra had a mission: to use his music to resettle African Americans on a different planet.

This course will explore matters of race and gender as they relate to and are approached in science fiction novels, graphic novels, music, and film by the likes of Ray Bradbury, Octavia Butler, Janelle Monáe, Funkadelic, Sam Delany, Nalo Hopkinson, and more.

1701: Creative Writing I

This course satisfies the following:

  • Required for the Concentration in Creative Writing

1701 |  F 10:10 - 12:40 | Shaw, Fran

In-class writing experiments help us write short stories, poetry, memoir, and humor. Discover an unexpected source of creativity from which words freely flow. Become your own best editor.

2000-Level Courses

2401: Poetry

This course satisfies the following:

  • General Education Requirements: Content Area One (Arts & Humanities - Literature)
  • English Major Requirements:
    • 2008-2016 Plans: Section C (Methods) or F (Elective courses)
    • 2017-2019 Plans: Section C (Genre) or F (Elective courses)
  • Meets the Elective requirement for the English Minor
  • Meets one of NEAG’s Secondary Education Genre requirements
  • Applies toward the Genre category for the Concentration in Creative Writing

2401 |  M 3:35 - 6:05 | Fisher, Ira

You are invited to step through the door to a vast meadow called poetry. This course will inspire you to appreciate and understand the poem and develop skill in reading the poem. You will encounter great writing. And great writers. You will read many poems. You will be required to express your thoughts about particular poems in class discussions… and in writing. Together we will consider rhythm, meter, figurative language, imagery, irony, persona, and symbolism.

You will develop confidence to defend your love for a particular poem… or to defend your dislike of it. Good reading will also inspire the foundational sentence for the course’s required writing… and to build upon the good reading, from line to page, from page to point… the remembered thought, carried on the back of honored language, to a memorable end. I encourage you to speak of such things or any things with the same honoring of language; to subdue the moment’s shyness so as to raise expression higher than you ever thought possible.

Attend class regularly and complete the assignments fully and conscientiously… to find the light that shines on this worthy pursuit.  The poems speak to you and to me.

2408: Modern Drama

This course satisfies the following:

  • General Education Requirements: Content Area One (Arts & Humanities)
  • English Major Requirements:
    • 2008-2016 Plans: Section C (Methods) or Section F (Elective Courses)
    • 2017-2019 Plans: Section C (Genre) or Section F (Elective courses)
  • Meets the Elective requirement for the English Minor
  • Meets one of NEAG’s Secondary Education Genre requirements
  • Meets the Genre requirement for the Concentration in Creative Writing

2408 |  TuTh 2:00 - 3:15 | Brown, Pam

Drama is mysterious: why do we love to see real people play imagined ones, in fictions about human emotions and conflicts and joys? How does theater work on us, and what is its purpose? What are the major forms and styles of modern drama? How do race, class, gender and sexuality intersect in this genre, especially in the dimension of performance?

This course will strive to make you a better reader, viewer, critic and audience for the many dramas you take in on film and in the theater.  You will read works by major playwrights from the early 20th century to today, including Samuel Beckett, Tennessee Williams, August Wilson, Tony Kushner, and Lyn Nottage, among others.  We will also act out a scene or two, see plays on film, and attend at least one live play in the theater.

Required work includes short response papers, quizzes, a midterm, and a final.

2409: The Modern Novel

This course satisfies the following:

  • General Education Requirements: Content Area One (Arts & Humanities)
  • English Major Requirements:
    • 2008-2016 Plans: Section C (Methods) or Section F (Elective Courses)
    • 2017-2019 Plans: Section C (Genre) or Section F (Elective courses)
  • Meets the Elective requirement for the English Minor
  • Meets one of NEAG’s Secondary Education Genre requirements
  • Meets the Genre requirement for the Concentration in Creative Writing

2409 |  F 1:25 - 3:55 | Cramer, Morgne

The Modern Novel focuses on novels published since 1900. You will view historical and biographical documentaries as well as powerpoint lectures that provide background for each author and novel.

The unifying context for this course is Modernism — its roots in the late 19th and early 20th centuries (Unit 1) and its aftereffects on contemporary authors (Unit 2). Modernism denotes an international movement in the arts (e.g. painting, music, literature, philosophy, architecture). In literature, modernism refers to avant-garde, experimental writings characterized by radical rejections of 19th century (Victorian) literary, political, and moral values. Modernists are rebels in lifestyle and art, driven by profound alienation from the status quo and a belief that the unprecedented political and intellectual upheavals of their time required a new kind of literature and truth telling.

UNIT 1:

  • Samuel Butler (1835-1902), The Way of All Flesh (1903)
  • Virginia Woolf (1888-1941), To the Lighthouse (1927) ; A Room of One’s Own (1929)
  • E. M. Forster (1882-1941), Maurice (written 1913-14; published 1971)

UNIT 2:

  • James Baldwin (1924-1987), Go Tell It on the Mountain  (1953)
  • Margaret Atwood (1939), Oryx and Crake (1985)
  • J. M. Coetzee (b. 1940), Disgrace (1999)

    2413W: The Graphic Novel

    This course satisfies the following:

    • General Education Requirements: Content Area One (Arts & Humanities) and one Writing Competency course
    • English Major Requirements:
      • 2008-2019 Plans: Section F (Elective Courses)
    • Meets the Elective requirement for the English Minor
    • Applies toward the Elective category for the Concentration in Creative Writing

    2413W | Saturday 10:10 - 12:40 | Moeckel-Rieke, Hannelore

    The graphic novel and - more broadly - sequential art, is a form of story-telling and a medium that has become widely popular all over the world. The course will cover different forms of sequential art beginning with short narratives in newspapers starting in the 1890s and superhero comics originating in the 1930s which have since provided youth culture around the globe with quasi-mythical figures. The intriguing combination of image and text has long outgrown the realm of popular fiction, however, and the genre has become a powerful medium for the discussion of a broad range of topics including gender, violence, social class, international conflict and genocide. Authors in countries including Israel, Rwanda, Iran, Colombia and France have used the medium to explore serious topics. Because of the graphic elements, these narratives have also become cutting edge in exploring the boundaries of traditional book and online narrative, raising questions about authorship, literary market and copyright.

    The course will explore some of the classical and acclaimed graphic novels as well as a selection of online art and discuss the social and economic issues connected to these publications. In this interdisciplinary course, we may also be able to interact with the author of one of these texts.

      2600: Introduction to Literary Studies

      This course satisfies the following:

      • English Major Requirements:
        • 2008-2019 Plans: Section A (Introduction to Literary Studies)
      • Meets the Elective requirement for the English Minor

      Note: English 2600 is required for all English Majors and should be taken as early as possible in order to progress in the degree.


      2600 | W 3:35 - 6:05 | Cramer, Morgne

      Introduction to Literary Studies introduces students to how literary scholars read, argue, and research. This course is required for all English majors and will prepare students with skills fundamental to literary studies. These include close textual readings; basic research tools (e.g., OED, MLA); and literary terminology. Students will also be introduced to different schools of critical theory; genres (e.g., poetry, prose, drama); and major movements in British and American literature.

      This course is organized around “classic” statements about the nature and aims of literature and literary studies. Your most important task is to read these essays closely, make meaningful comparisons among these position papers, and respond in writing and class discussion from your own point of view.

      A key goal for the class is (1) to develop a precise understanding of essays/position statements that have shaped literary studies and (2) to develop your capacity to respond to, evaluate, and shape your own opinions in relation to the essays we read: i.e., engage critically with the authors on your own terms.

        3000-Level Courses

        3003W: Advanced Expository Writing

        This course satisfies the following:

        • General Education Requirements: One Writing Competency course
        • English Major Requirements:
          • 2008-2014 Plans: Section C2 (Methods) or Section F (Elective Courses)
          • 2015 & 2016 Plans: Section F (Elective Courses)
            • Note: Restrictions may apply for Catalog years 2008-2016
          • 2017-2019 Plans: Section F (Elective Courses)
        • Meets the Elective requirement for the English Minor
        • Meets the Composition requirement for the Concentration in Teaching English
        • Applies toward the elective category for the Concentration in Creative Writing

          3003W | Saturday 10:10 - 12:40 | Shaw, Fran

          Business Writing

          Writing clear and effective letters, memos, proposals, reports, press releases, and other business documents. Strengthen your proofreading skills for error-free work.

           

          3113W: Renaissance Literature

          This course satisfies the following:

          • General Education Requirements: One Writing Competency course
          • English Major Requirements:
            • 2008-2016 Plans: Section B1 (Survey and Period Courses Before 1800) and Section F (Elective Courses)
            • 2017-2019 Plans: Section B1 (British Literature) and Section F (Elective Courses)
          • Meets the Elective requirement for the English Minor

          3113W | TuTh 12:30 - 1:45 | Brown, Pam

          Instability marks the period some call early modern, others the Renaissance. Certainties about the true Church, God as the ultimate authority, the solar system and cosmos, and the definition of the human were turned upside down, while the known world expanded radically.  Literature and art also changed radically as a result.

          To gain an understanding of this period of revolution, invention and Reformation  (roughly 1500 to 1660) we will read writings by English and European men and women who lived in this topsy-turvy age, sometimes criticizing the new juggernaut of expansion and realpolitik. "The Renaissance” reached the remote isle of England quite late, but exploded when it did, producing great writers from Thomas More to William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, William Spenser, and John Donne, and prodigies such as Elizabeth I and Mary Wroth.

          Requirements: 15 pages of revised writing, a final exam, and a weekly reading journal.

           

          3613W: Introduction to LGBT Literature

          This course satisfies the following:

          • General Education Requirements: Content Area Four (USA) and one Writing Competency course
          • English Major Requirements:
            • 2008-2016 Plans: Section C1 (Methods) and Section F (Elective Courses)
            • 2015 & 2016 Plans: Section C (Methods) and Section F (Elective Courses)
            • 2017-2019 Plans: Section F (Elective Courses)
          • Meets the Elective requirement for the English Minor and the Women's, Gender, and Sexualities Studies Minor
          • Meets the Multicultural Literature requirement for the Concentration in Teaching English

          3613 | W 6:20 - 8:50 | Görkemli, Serkan

          In this course, we will read and analyze novels, a memoir, and a play about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) experiences. Class discussions and assignments will focus on the elements of fiction and the pre- and post-Stonewall representations of LGBT identities in the assigned coming-of-age and coming-out texts from the twentieth century.

          In addition, we will learn about LGBT history and the theories of gender and sexuality through documentary films. This knowledge will help us locate the assigned literary texts in the cultural and historical contexts in which they were produced and are currently read. In this manner, we will view literary works as authors’ creative intervention in society and politics concerning LGBT experiences and how those experiences are represented. This approach to texts will also highlight identity politics in each text through the discussion of other identity categories, such as race, ethnicity, social class, and religious affiliation.

          Assignments will include daily quizzes, textual analyses, and a final reflection essay.

           

          4000-Level Courses

          4201W: Advanced Study in American Literature

          This course satisfies the following:

          • General Education Requirements: One Writing Competency course
          • English Major Requirements:
            • 2008-2019 Plans: Section E (Advanced Study)
          • Meets the Elective requirement for the English Minor

          4201W | Tu 5:30 - 8:00 | Pierrot, Gregoy

          Americas That Aren't: Alternative Histories in American Literature

          “The nose of Cleopatra: had it been shorter, the face of the entire world would have been changed.”

          Philosopher Pascal’s famous phrase is not just a clever pun: it conveys a widely shared vision of history as the result of decisions made by rulers and important people and suggests that minute changes in those decisions could have great consequences. How different would the world be if important events had had different outcomes? Thinkers and writers have long played speculative games of “what if…?” applied to a variety of places, people and circumstances, but alternative histories have become a staple of American popular culture, especially in the latter 20th and early 21st century.

          Looking at fiction, art, film and other sources, this course will explore fictional parallel worlds: alternative USAs where Revolution failed, or the South won the Civil War, or the Axis powers World War II. Works of fantasy by the likes of Philip K. Dick, Harry Turtledove, Michael Chabon and others make us consider these United States in the light of Americas that aren’t.