Course Descriptions: Storrs Campus

Fall 2020


Each semester the faculty for the Department of English provide course descriptions that build upon the University's catalog descriptions. These individually crafted descriptions provide information about variable topics, authors, novels, texts, writing assignments, and whether instructor consent is required to enroll. The details, along with reviewing the advising report, will help students select course options that best meet one's interests and academic requirements.

The following list includes Undergraduate courses that are sequenced after the First-Year Writing requirement and will change each semester.

Honors Courses

Honors courses are limited to fifteen to twenty students in each section. They are open only to Honors students or with the consent of the instructor. This semester, we are offering: 


1601W-02 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Knapp, Kathy

Contact instructor for details


2407-03: The Short Story | TuTh 8:00-9:15 | Codr, Dwight

This course will entail the study and analysis of fictional writing. We will read 20-30 excellent short stories, but our concern will be with fiction and fictionalization broadly conceived. Students will gain an understanding of the formal properties of fiction and narrative and will cultivate the ability to generate a critical interpretation of a given text. Finally, we will study the way in which the short story as a genre concerns itself with difference or otherness, how the form we know as the short story has, at its core, a particular fascination with the inexplicable, complicated, uncategorizable, and extraordinary.

Class meetings will consist of a combination of lectures, discussions, and small group activities. Written assignments may include textual explications, reading journals, discussion board posts, and/or an argumentative essay of 4-5 pages. There will be a midterm and final exam testing your reading comprehension and your grasp of key concepts in the analysis of literary texts.


3218W-01: Ethnic Literatures of the United States | M 2:30-5:00 | Makowsky, Veronica

What is an American? How does ethnicity affect one's sense of identity? How do class, race, sexuality, gender, generation, and location(s) interact with ethnicity to form or challenge identity or to suggest identities contingent upon context?

In addition to these broad questions about ethnicity and identity, this course also considers how movement over time and space (withtin the US, to the US, from the US, and globally) may lead to unstable or fluid senses of identity.

We will read a play, short stories, novels, and autobiographies. The texts encompass Native American works such as Zitkala-Sa's American Indian Stories (excerpts) and Louise Erdrich's The Round House; African American works such as Narrative of the Life of Frederick DouglassAn American Slave, and August Wilson's Fences; and works concerning immigrant experiences including a collection of short stories by Anzia Yezierska, Tina DeRosa's Paper Fish, Julie Otsuka's When the Emperor Was Divine, Edwidge Danticat's Breath, Eyes, Memory, and Noviolet Bulawayo's We Need New Names.

Grades will be based on: active participation in daily discussions, which usually includes in-class writing assignments based on the day's assigned reading; 3 short (2 page) response papers and their revision; and a research paper and its revision (9-10 pages).

1000-Level Courses

1012W: Business Writing I

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

1012W-01 | This course is being offered online. | Bird, Trudi 

This course provides an introduction to the rhetorical and genre conventions of business writing. Expect to work on letters, memoranda, reports, press releases, proposals, resumes and cover letters for job applications, job descriptions, letters of reference, and mission statements. Expect to improve your persuasive skills and become a more effective writer. Depending on the interests of the class, we may also work on the various kinds of writings involved in conducting meetings, and on the etiquette of international correspondence.

Since one goal of business writing is to be concise, most of the assignments will be under a page in length. Revision of most assignments will be required, after peer review and instructor feedback. The course requires that these brief written assignments and revisions be submitted on a near-daily basis, beginning on the first day of the semester. You will write several short written “one-pagers”, responses to the course readings. You will need to purchase a hard-copy version of the required text. No electronics will be used during class meetings.

The course will not duplicate, but will rather supplement BADM4070W and BADM4075W. ENGL1012W supplements COMM 2100, Professional Communication.

1101W: Classical and Medieval Western Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

1101W-01 | MWF 9:05-9:55 | Gallucci, Mary

1103W: Renaissance and Modern Western Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

1103W-01 | Tu 6:00-8:30 | Pelizzon, Penelope

In this course, we’ll spend time with some of the most fabulous poems, stories, novels, and plays of the last 500 years. We’ll read works by Polish, Russian, Turkish, Greek, French, German, Italian, Mexican, American, and English authors. We’ll work roughly chronologically backwards, beginning with some 20th century writers whose historical context is likely to be more familiar, moving in reverse to periods where we’ll call on secondary materials to help ground our understanding of the issues at stake for each writer. Many of our authors will be in translation, and we may spend some time discussing several translations of the same text to consider how different translators in different periods have made varying choices about which elements of a work to carry over into English.

Authors likely to appear on the syllabus include: Constantine Cavafy, Nazim Hikmet, Gwendolyn Brooks, Paul Celan, Wisława Szymborska, Marina Tsvetaeva, Italo Calvino, Virginia Woolf, Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Rimbaud, Anton Chekhov, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, and William Shakespeare.

Projects will likely include weekly short question and reflection writings, three revised papers, an essay midterm, and an essay final.

1201: Introduction to American Studies

Also offered as AMST 1201 and HIST 1503. Not open to students who have passed INTD 276.

1201-01 | TuTh 2:30-3:15 | Vials, Christopher

This course serves as an introduction to American Studies, a method of studying U.S. culture that brings together techniques and materials from across a wide range of disciplines and interdisciplines such as history, literature, political science, political economy, ethnic studies, art history, gender studies, and media studies.

In this particular section, we will apply this method to the study of social movements in 20th century U.S. history, and how these movements, often beginning on the fringes, have transformed beliefs, policies, and institutions in the American mainstream. We will look at movements on the left and the right in order to understand our contemporary political environment. On the left, we will study the Popular Front of the 1930s, civil rights, the various movements of the late 1960s, AIDS activism in the 1980s, and finally, antifa. On the right, we will study the Ku Klux Klan, Father Coughlin’s “Christian Front” in the 1930s, George Wallace’s third party presidential campaign in 1968, neoliberalism, and the alt-right. As we do so, we will be mindful of how these U.S.-based political movements were shaped by global political currents, including fascism in Europe, anticolonial struggles in the global south, or communism in Asia and the USSR. We will also study how economic structures frame the lived experiences out of which social movements emerge.

Some of your assignments will ask you to examine the pamphlets, newspapers, magazines, and (later) websites that these movements produced in order to get an overall sense of their programs, their appeals to their memberships, and their places in history.

1503: Introduction to Shakespeare

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

1503-01 | MWF 11:05-11:55 | Gallucci, Mary

 

1601W: Race, Gender, and the Culture Industry

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

1601W-01 | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Testa, Richard

This course will focus on the cultural construction of race and gender in American literature, film/tv, and music. Students will discuss the issues of race and gender in 20th Century popular culture through various historical perspectives. We will critically analyze American culture and society from the most racist movie ever made, The Birth of a Nation (1915), to jazz & other popular music, to radio & television programming, to the Harlem Renaissance and the Equal Rights Amendment. The course aims to help students become articulate in discussing the issues of race and gender in literature and popular culture and, with its focus on artistic works, acquire historical perspective. By understanding the very different aesthetic movements of earlier generations, students will become more aware of their own era and society.


1601W-02 | TuTh 8:00-9:15 | Phillips, Jerry

1601W-02 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Knapp, Kathy

Honors Section

1616: Major Works of English and American Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

1601-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Fairbanks, Ruth

This course will focus on the idea of the hero figure, consideration of the hero’s predicaments, and various treatments of the hero in British and American Literature.   Readings will include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, King Lear, Sense and Sensibility, Wuthering Heights, a selection of Hawthorne’s short fiction, Turn of the Screw, The Awakening, Saint Joan, Dubliners, Betrayal.  This list may change somewhat but will include novels, some short fiction, and plays.

Course requirements: Class participation, quizzes, two short papers, midterm, final.

 

1616W: Major Works of English and American Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

1616W-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Tonry, Kathleen

This course traces an eco-conscious thread through American and British literature. We’ll read fictive works that ask us to consider with curiosity, reverence, awe, dismay, laughter, and sometimes rage the relation of humans to the natural world. We’ll use this thread as a guide across several centuries of literature, covering a range of texts including medieval animal fables, Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, and J.M. Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals.

Students will be asked to keep up with a fast-paced set of readings, and are expected to write and revise several short papers, and make regular contributions to class discussion.


1616W-02 | MW 6:10-7:25 | Kryzwda, Steve

English 1616W starts with Macbeth, arguably the “most vehement, the most concentrated…the most tremendous of the [four great] tragedies.” Aside from oodles of violence, death, treachery and witchcraft, Shakespeare introduces his most eloquent villain who, as A.C Bradley notes, holds us in thrall by virtue of his speech. For poetry, we will do a brief flyover of Robert Frost. Frost is both readable and enjoyable. But his seemingly casual, conversational style belies his technical and thematic sophistication. We cap off the course with The Turn of the Screw, by Henry James, the scariest ghost story ever. It is a classic Gothic thriller: A young governess, on first assignment, assumes charge of two ostensibly angelic siblings. But Bly, an isolated estate, has many secrets; for instance, the two children, Miles and Flora, are communing with souls of the damned.

Course requirements: three essays, each revised once. I also do a mini grammar lesson at the start of each class that will once and forever dispel your grammar phobia.

 

1701: Creative Writing I

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Cannot be taken for credit after passing ENGL 3701, 3703, or 3713.

1701-01 | W 6:00-8:30 | Pelizzon, Penelope

This class is an intensive introduction to writing poetry and creative nonfiction. Over the semester, you’ll write and revise three poems and two nonfiction essays, which we’ll workshop in class. You’ll also hone your skills with weekly craft exercises designed to develop your skills with imagery, diction, figurative language, rhythm, rhyme, voice, setting, and characterization. Meanwhile, we’ll attend regular readings by poets and prose writers, and you’ll write reviews of these events. All along the way, you’ll be reading many fantastic poems and essays by a variety of authors.

By the end of the semester, you’ll have a strong foundation in poetic and nonfiction techniques. Be prepared to read avidly, write adventurously, and provide generous feedback to your fellow class authors on their work.


1701-02 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Choffel, Julie

This course provides an introduction to the writer’s workshop in poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction. We will approach creative writing as an experimental and often collaborative process. In this class you will be required to read and write daily through new styles and forms; to take unexpected turns and risks in your own writing, to destroy and reconstruct through creative revision, and above all, to contribute to conversations about the results.

We will talk and write about what we read and what we write and what happens next. Immersed in this practice, you will create your own works of short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, and revise your strongest works for a final portfolio. Additional class requirements include regular attendance, timely completion of assignments, and keeping a writer’s journal.


1701-03 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Cohen, Bruce

This introductory class to creative writing will provide instruction to the craft, techniques and esthetics of writing poetry and creative nonfiction. Students will also focus on critical analysis of other students’ work and develop a “community” language for discussing literature; therefore, class participation will be essential. Students will be required to compose seven polished poems and two creative nonfiction essays. Students will learn to become acquainted with the “workshop” format and be required to read contemporary poetry and non-fiction with the end result being to better understand and deepen their appreciation of the practice of creative writing. Students will also be required to attend at least two readings on campus.


1701-04 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Brush, Julia

In this introductory course we will delve into poetry and performance pieces through experimentation and practice in new and familiar forms. Our tasks include creating a vibrant writing community and valuing critique as a reflective mode for our writing. Our work will include composing, revising, critiquing, and cultivating a personal writing practice that culminates in the creation of a final project. The final project might be a collection of writing experiments, a performance, an adaptation, or creation of a hybrid project.

In addition to weekly writing, we will read the work of contemporary writers and artists whose work celebrates experimentation and performance. Possible poets include Diana Khoi Nguyen, Joshua Whitehead, Franny Choi, Claudia Rankine, Jericho Brown, Tyehemba Jess and others. Potential performance writers and artists include David Henry Hwang, Barry Jenkins, Brit Marling & Zal Batmanglij, Ghayath Almadoun, Trinh T. Minh-Ha, and more. Our work will take a multimedia approach as we look at stage plays, video-poems, screenplays and film texts, visual art, and other kinds of work to inspire our creative processes. We will also explore our latent inspirations around campus, including trips to the Benton, Dodd Center, Babbidge Library, the Contemporary Art Museum as well as screenings and live performances.

All creative thinkers and makers are welcome.


1701-05 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Pontacoloni, Michael

In this course you will learn strategies and techniques for turning inspiration and idea into art. Through the careful study of contemporary poetry and fiction, you’ll examine and explore the ways meaning is created with language. You’ll apply these observed methods to your own work while experimenting towards an original style and voice. Peer workshop, close reading, and revision will be at the heart of the curriculum. Students will conclude the course with a portfolio of five poems and two short stories.

2000-Level Courses

2001: Introduction to Grant Proposal Writing

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2001-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Courtmanche, Jason

Grant Writing will introduce you to the basics of grants and grant writing. It is open to students from all majors. We will explore your research interests, develop a proposal, identify possible sources of funding, review Requests for Proposals (RFPs), review successfully awarded grant proposals, talk with grant writers and other professionals who work in the field, and, finally, write, revise, and ultimately submit a grant proposal.

Students in this course will engage in a lot of hands-on work—conducting research, working in small groups to share ideas, reading grant proposals as mentor texts, drafting and revising the texts of your own proposals, and giving and receiving feedback on your ideas and proposals.

There will be regularly collected and assessed writing assignments specific to each grant, but due dates may vary depending on the deadlines prescribed by the differing RFPs being pursued by members of the class.

In addition to the work of writing a grant, I will expect you to keep a weekly journal in which you write about the process. These journals will be where you take notes, explore ideas, draft your proposals, and reflect upon the process. I will collect and respond to these at key points throughout the course.

Required text (preliminary): Ellen Karsh, The Only Grant Book You'll Ever Need

2013W: Introduction to Writing Studies

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2013W | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Deans, Tom

2100: British Literature I

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2100-01 | MWF 11:15-12:05 | Cordon, Joanne

ROAD TRIP!

This class is a tour of prose, drama and poetry from the medieval period through the eighteenth century. The cultures associated with these texts are distant in time, custom and belief, so investigating this literature requires the diligence, sense of humor and open-mindedness of an explorer. Readings are in the Broadview Anthology of British Literature, concise Volume A, 3rd edition. Texts may include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Twelfth Night, and The School for Scandal. Course requirements include class discussion, four quizzes, short essay, midterm and final exam.


2100-02 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Gouws, Dennis

This lecture course surveys British literature from the medieval period through the 18th century. Intended to provide preparation for more advanced courses in British literature, ENGL2100 is strongly recommended for English majors. Class participation, three tests, and a final exam determine the grade. The required texts are Greenblatt, Stephen et al. Eds. The Norton Anthology of English Literature Volumes A, B, and C. 10th Edition, 2018. This is a group-one general-education course.

2101: British Literature II

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2101-01 | M 5:00-7:30 | Barreca, Regina

This demanding class, designed with ambitious students in mind, includes works by some of the most significant British writers of the previous two centuries. We'll be reading The Good Soldier, Dubliners, Short Stories by Katherine Mansfield, Keep the Aspidistra Flying, The Death of the Heart, The Girls of Slender Means, Asylum and White Teeth. Class participation required; two exams and frequent in-class writings; strict attendance policy.


2101-02 | MWF 9:05-9:55 | Rumbo, Rebecca

In this course we will attempt a judicious balance as we explore the poetry and prose of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The course will be arranged in roughly chronological order. Beginning with the early Romantic poetsBlake, Burns, Wordsworth, and Coleridgewe will continue with Byron, Shelley, and Keats, also dipping into prose by Wollstonecraft and Carlyle.

As we move into the Victorian era, we will read poetry by Tennyson, Robert Browning, and Arnold, examine a smattering of the prose, and dig into the most influential genre of the period: fiction. In the twentieth century, we will gaze upon the death of Victorian idealism through the poetry of Wilfred Owen, and then explore cultural revolution in the work of Yeats, Woolf, and Eliot. A dusting of later writers— Thomas, Auden and Heaney—will finish our tour.

Besides the very demanding reading load, students will take quizzes, midterm and final exams, and write one or more essays. Class participation is required. Textbooks will include the Norton “Major Authors” Anthology, volume B plus others (two novels) to be named later.

2200: Literature & Culture of North American Before 1800

Also offered as AMST 2200. Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2200-01 | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Franklin, Wayne

This course will examine the early written and oral record of what eventually became the United States. Our readings will be drawn from a variety of sources: recorded Indigenous mythic and historic texts, travel accounts originally written in various European languages (e.g., French, Spanish, Dutch, German, and English), works centered on Indigenous-Euro-American contact and conflict, social history documents of literary value, key political documents, and poetry, early fiction, and autobiography. Secondary readings on Husky CT will serve to illuminate the cultural contexts within which the primary texts were created. We also will consider various non-textual analogues (e.g., architecture, art, landscape, material culture, and social, economic, and political institutions) that will be introduced during weekly discussions and mini-lectures.

The goal is to achieve a rich understanding of the ways in which peoples of many varied backgrounds, from the Asian-derived indigenous inhabitants of North America to the various immigrant populations from continental Europe and the British Isles and the enslaved Africans they introduced to the Western hemisphere, came to express their views of the land and their experiences on it and with each other.

There will be a quiz on each major title. Students will write an 8-10 page paper on our final reading. There will be a midterm exam but no final.

2201W: American Literature to 1880

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011 or 3800

2201W-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Reynolds, John

This course will take a selective look at the writers and the social, political, philosophical and religious contexts that formed American literature from the earliest records to 1880. Readings will include autobiography, essay, sermon, poetry, short fiction, and novel. This class will be primarily discussion with some lectures. Regular attendance is critical, and I expect active participation in class discussions.

There will be reading quizzes, two analytical essays of varying length, a mid-semester exam, and a final exam.


2201W-02 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Reynolds, John

Please see description above.

2203: American Literature Since 1880

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2203-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Phillips, Jerry

2203W: American Literature Since 1880

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2203W-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Goldman, Eric

Modern Transitions and Transformations in American Literature and Culture

The class will explore American literary Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Authors will include Twain, Crane, Jewett, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hurston, Morrison, and others. The late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries were periods of extremely rapid transformations of American life. In our discussions, we will consider how American literature of this period prompts us to consider the effects of some of the key transformative features of modernity: the introduction of new technology to daily life; industrialized warfare; manmade environmental change; shifting race and gender relations; and the exponentially accelerating pace of modern life.

Students must come prepared for each class with reading notes and writing exercises, write and revise two short papers and two long ones, and demonstrate mastery of key terms and concepts in a final examination.


2203W-02 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Courtmanche, Jason

Power, Privilege, and Prejudice in Modern and Contemporary American Literature

The abuse of privilege, the arbitrary exercise of power, the stoking of prejudice for personal advantage. Of course I’m describing some of the major themes of the works we will be reading, discussing, and writing about in this section of American Literature Since 1880.

Building on transactional theories of reading and writing, students will be asked to make connections between literature and the world, and to compose a term paper that interprets some aspect of our contemporary world through the lens(es) of the course texts.

Because this is a W, there will be regular writing work, including response groups and conferences, and the drafting and revising of six 750-word papers (around 4500 words or 15 pages). I expect regular attendance and participation. There will be some brief lectures, but expect mostly discussion and small group work.

Required texts (a preliminary list): Toni Morrison, Beloved; Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian; Octavia Butler, The Parable of the Sower; Ann Patchett, The Patron Saint of Liars; Marilynne Robinson, Gilead; Leigh Bardugo, Ninth House

2214W: African American Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2214W-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Duane, Anna Mae

This course will explore the rich traditions of African American literature in the U.S. and the Caribbean. We will begin with the writing of enslaved people (Phillis Wheatley, Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs) struggling to make a case for freedom, and continue with post-Civil War writers navigating the realities of the color line and Jim Crow laws (W.E.B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston). We will end the semester with a focus on Afro-futurism through the work of award-winning Octavia Butler, Jordan Peele and Junot Diaz, among others.

2274W: Disability in American Literature and Culture

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2274W-01 | TuTh 5:00-6:15 | Duane, Anne Mae

The term “freaks,” like so many other derogatory epithets, has come to have a two-fold meaning. Originally meant pejoratively, the word freak has been reclaimed by many within the disabled community as a badge of difference, as a mark of one’s identity, and as an indication of being extraordinary.

In this course we will explore the ways in which the extraordinary body has been used culturally to help reinforce ideas of normality. We will ask how disability has been enfolded in depictions of various “others.” We will also consider how ideas of disability continue to evolve, and how our quest for perfection shapes everyone’s future. In the process, we will also be engaging a variety of theoretical questions that have material consequences on social policy, and the lives of people affected by those policies.

2276: American Utopias and Dystopias

Also offered as AMST 2276. Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2276-01 | TuTh 8:00-9:15 | Eby, Clare

This course focuses mostly on recent dystopian novels but includes a number of short selections from The Utopia Reader (edited by Claeys and Sargeant) to provide some understanding of the long history of the utopian tradition. The contemporary novels will probably showcase the following harrowing stories: a young Native American woman’s pregnancy during a time of escalating efforts to control reproduction (Louise Erdrich’s Future Home of the Living God); a zombie novel set in an America where capitalism has run amock (Colson Whitehead’s Zone One); a Nazi takeover of America (Philip Roth’s The Plot Against America); an urban satire of social media, income inequality, and rampaging narcissism (Gary Shteyngart’s Super Sad True Love Story); a sole human survivor tormented by memories of life before the end, tasked with educating a gentle race of posthumans (Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake); and a haunting but inspiring story about a man and boy walking through postapocalyptic America (Cormac McCarthy’s The Road).

Course requirements: four one-page position papers (20% of final grade), midterm (20%), final (20%), regular quizzes (20%), and discussion (20%). Because discussion is 20% of the final grade, this course is not a good fit for the silent types.

2301W: Anglophone Literatures

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2301W-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Hogan, Patrick

Colonialism invariably relies on and develops racism. But the contact of colonizers and colonized people also fosters genuine human feeling and guilt in some colonizers, while the entire situation often encourages both shame and anger among the colonized. There are common themes, narrative structures, metaphors, and other aspects of literary practice that recur in relation to these contradictory feelings. On the other hand, there are also some differences, related to the specific histories and cultures of the places, as well as the type of colonialism involved. In this course, we will consider some of the recurring literary features, such as interracial romantic love, and family separation and reunion, as well as some of the more systematic differences.

More specifically, we will look at a couple of prominent works from different sorts of colonialism, some by writers from the colonizer group, others by writers from the colonized group. We will probably begin with the “settler majority” colonies, considering family separation narratives by Margaret Atwood (Canada) and Doris Garimara (Australia). From there, we will turn to a “settler minority” country—South Africa. In this part of the course, we will take up the treatment of interracial romance by J. M. Coetzee, perhaps going on to the appearance of age-grade models of race (e.g., the racist view of Africans as children) as examined by Athol Fugard. The third section will consider “displaced majority” colonies, where the majority of the population is neither ancestrally native to the place nor descended from colonizers. Here, we will consider poetry from a range of Afro-Caribbean writers. Finally, we will consider a couple of works from India, an “occupation” colony with little permanent colonial settlement. (In the unlikely event that there is time, we might briefly consider one work treating either Biafra or Kashmir, thus the category of colonialism by former colonies.)

Coursework will include: one or two group presentations, reading, short responses to readings, and class participation, one 6-page paper explicating part of one of the literary works, and one 10-page paper involving cultural or historical research integrated with explication of part of one of the literary works.

2401: Poetry

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2401-01 | MWF 9:05-9:55 | Ascenzo, Margaret

2401-02 | MWF 11:15-12:05 | Ascenzo, Margaret

2401-03 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Cohen, Bruce

This course will focus on the close reading and analysis of verse to expand your appreciation of the traditions of poetry. We will explore poetic techniques, forms and strategies and learn to critically analyze poetry. In essence, we will delve into what makes a poem a “poem.” We will discuss some of the various “schools” of poetry to provide you with some historical context for the sensibilities and conventions of poetry. The goal of the course is to expand your interest in poetry to the point that you will read it outside of class, well after the course has concluded and be able to discuss poetry in an intelligent manner. Course requirements include class participation, exercises, a mid-term and a final exam.


2401-04 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Mahoney, Charles

True ease in writing comes from art, not chance/As those move easiest who have learned to dance. (Alexander Pope, “An Essay on Criticism”)

As for writing, so for reading: a course in learning how to let your feet go bare in verse. We will concentrate on poetic artifice and technique, meter and form, sound and sense (ever attentive to Wallace Stevens’s dictum that “There is a sense in sounds beyond their meaning”), across a selective survey of poetry in English from the sixteenth century to the 2010s. We will emphasize the close reading of a variety of forms and genres (e.g., sonnets, ballads, elegies, odes, blank verse, nonsense verse, nursery rhymes), attending throughout to questions of a poem’s “literariness:" how its language works, how it is made, how it is composed for its particular rhetorical end, and how it interacts with its own literary history. Likely requirements: attendance and participation, quizzes, close reading assignments, final examination.


2401-05 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Forbes, Sean

This course is an introduction to poetry in English, designed to familiarize you with a range of poetic forms and modes from the 16th through the 21st centuries. We’ll read, discuss, and write about many different kinds of poems as ways of enjoying their wealth of rhythms, figures, and rhetorical effects. We’ll pay attention to the way poems sound, you’ll hear poems aloud in class, and at visiting writer events. You’ll also memorize and recite poems yourself, since memorization allows you inside a poem in a rather magical way. By the end of the course, you’ll have a good understanding of how content and sound work together in poetry, and you’ll know a selection of important poems and poetic forms.


2401-06 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Choffel, Julie

2405: Drama

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011 or 3800

2405-01 | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Layman, Thomas

2405-02 | MWF 12:20-1:10 | Layman, Thomas

2407: The Short Story

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2407-01 | MWF 11:15-12:05 | Rumbo, Rebecca

In this course, students will read short stories by a variety of writers of different times and places. We will learn to analyze and understand the genre, considering plot, theme, character, and technique. Assignments will include one or more brief papers, participation in class discussion, and midterm and final exams.


2407-02 | MW 4:40-5:55 | Kryzwda, Steve

Students will sample a broad spectrum of short stories. Each tale serves to illustrate a particular style, topic or theme.  Students also have an opportunity to hone their writing skills, as I review the essay format and common grammar pitfalls.  The text is the 8th, full-length edition of The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction. There will be three short essays and an essay final.  Those who do all three regular essays will have their lowest score dropped.  The take-home essay final cannot be dropped. This is primarily, but not exclusively, a lecture course.  We cover about nineteen stories in depth.


2407-03 | TuTh 8:00-9:15 | Codr, Dwight

Honors Section

This course will entail the study and analysis of fictional writing. We will read 20-30 excellent short stories, but our concern will be with fiction and fictionalization broadly conceived. Students will gain an understanding of the formal properties of fiction and narrative and will cultivate the ability to generate a critical interpretation of a given text. Finally, we will study the way in which the short story as a genre concerns itself with difference or otherness, how the form we know as the short story has, at its core, a particular fascination with the inexplicable, complicated, uncategorizable, and extraordinary.

Class meetings will consist of a combination of lectures, discussions, and small group activities. Written assignments may include textual explications, reading journals, discussion board posts, and/or an argumentative essay of 4-5 pages. There will be a midterm and final exam testing your reading comprehension and your grasp of key concepts in the analysis of literary texts.


2407-04 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Burke, Mary

This course will concentrate on short stories by American and international authors. Students will sample a broad spectrum of short stories illustrating a particular style, era, national tradition, or theme and will learn how to read with careful critical attention. Coursework will consist of a practice essay, a midterm long-format paper, response papers, group discussion, and a final assessment.


2407-05 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Mathews, Rebecca

This course introduces the ever-popular genre of the short story through a critical study and an analysis of an extensive selection of short stories from different parts of the globe and from various periods in literary history. This study encourages an exploration of a set of wide-ranging themes and techniques employed by these writers and attempts to promote an in depth examination, interpretation and understanding of human nature.

Course requirements: As this course involves discussions, quizzes, presentations and written responses, participation in classroom activities is mandatory. Students are expected to read the assigned literature for each class, as well as all the relevant material from the Commentary and the Casebook sections of the text in order to be prepared for in-class activities. These include active participation in discussions, presentations, in-class writing, a mid-term exam and a final essay.


2407-06 | This course is being offered online. | Codr, Dwight

This course is designed to introduce students to the short story as a literary form. The course, which includes short stories from a range of periods and authors, invites students to engage with these stories through formal writing assignments and discussion board posts. Students will also read theoretical texts and pieces of literary criticism, which they will apply to the assigned stories.

2408: Modern Drama

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2408-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Dennigan, Darcie

Theatre of the Absurd & Postmodern Absurdities

Why study modern and postmodern absurdist, Surrealist, Dada-esque, non-naturalistic plays? 1) To be okay with not knowing. As absurdist extraordinaire George Saunders puts it: “Try to remain permanently confused. Anything is possible. Stay open, forever, so open it hurts, and then open up some more, until the day you die, world without end, amen.” 2) To strengthen your synapses. "Most critics and theatergoers," playwright Maria Irene Fornes once said, "are so used to seeing plays in only one way what is the dramatic conflict? What are the symbols? That they go through their entire lives looking for the same things. If they don’t find what they expect, they’re disconcerted." Reading our texts, and staying with the difficulties that each one presents, will be an exercise in intellectual breadth and versatility, and in critical judgment: two of the goals for a UConn Gen Ed course. 3) To engage nonsense in the pursuit of sense. Studying these texts, and their historical, political, and philosophical contexts, will highlight the absurdity of humanity-- and only if we can recognize our absurdity can we celebrate the possibility of non-absurdity! 4) To gather courage to go on with your life.

Here comes another year, another semester, another day... "The comic alone is capable of giving us the strength to bear the tragedy of existence." That's Eugene Ionesco. Let's gather strength for this year, and beyond, through our study of theatrical absurdity.

Course requirements: Two essays, an incredible amount of class participation, and four 1-2 page reading responses.

2409: The Modern Novel

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2409-002 | MW 9:05-9:55 | Cordon, Joanne

2411: Popular Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2411-01 | TuTh 8:00-9:15 | Tribble, Evelyn

Detective and Crime Fiction

This class introduces you to the genre of detective and crime fiction from the late nineteenth century to the present. Crime fiction is one of the most popular generic forms in the world; it is estimated that up to 30% of novels published in English are some form of crime fiction. In this class we will examine its transformations from its roots in nineteenth-century positivism to its diverse sub-genres today. A central concern of the class will be the "ways of knowing" that are represented in crime fiction, especially detective fiction. Among the issues we will discuss are: the tensions between transparency and ambiguity, rationality and irrationality in the genre; gender and genre (including the codes of masculinity that inform the figure of the male detective and feminist rewritings of the genre); the relationship between place and crime; the transformation of the genre across media; the blurred lines between fiction and non-fiction; and the relationship of story to plot.

Texts:
Short stories by Edgar Allen Poe, Dashiell Hammet, Sara Paretsky, and Ian Rankin (to be confirmed) Arthur Conan Doyle,
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
Agatha Christie, Murder at the Vicarage
Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep
Attica Locke, Bluebird, Bluebird

Possible texts (2 or more of the following): Michael Chabon, The Yiddish Policeman's Union; James Ellroy, LA Confidential; Paul Auster, The Red Notebook; Walter Mosely, Six Easy PiecesVal McDiarmid, A Place of Execution; Kate Atkinson, Started Early, Took My Dog; Ed McBain, Cop Killer.

If you’re interested in reading ahead over the summer, feel free to email me for an updated list of texts.

Course requirements: A “pitch” for one book not on the syllabus to the class, making the case for its inclusion, accompanied by an expanded, written version that includes research on detective fiction; a test on critical terms and vocabulary for understanding crime fiction; a detective’s notebook that may include some creative assignments; an essay; and a final exam.


2411-02 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Knapp, Kathy

2411W: Popular Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2411W-01 | TuTh 5:00-6:15 | Grossman, Leigh

Ursula Le Guin said that JRR Tolkien “removed the apology from fantasy,” meaning that after Tolkien, writers could set their stories in a world distinct from our own without explaining that it was all a dream, or set in a distant past, or some other apology. But world-building has evolved a lot since Tolkien’s day, and many of the underlying theoretical assumptions that seemed so startling in the mid-1960s when the “pirated” edition of Lord of the Rings hit the U.S. market are tied to uncomfortable assumptions about race, gender, and sexuality.

The course looks at how the way fantasy writers build secondary worlds has evolved from Tolkien’s day to today’s fantasies, both through primary works and critical essays. Readings will start with classic works by Tolkien and Le Guin, but will mostly focus on current writers such as Guy Gavriel Kay, Michael Swanwick, Sarah Beth Durst, Nnedi Okorafor, and Rebecca Roanhorse.

2600: Introduction to Literary Studies

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1011 or 1011 or 2011. Open to English majors, others with instructor's consent.

2600-01 | TuTh 8:00-9:15 | Coundouriotis, Eleni

This gateway course into the major introduces you to the range of activities and types of analysis that define literary study. We will cover topics such as what makes a text literary, the formal conventions of different genres and key concepts of contemporary literary/critical theory. We will also explore different avenues for interdisciplinary and comparative studies. The course does not limit itself to a period or a genre, but uses an eclectic set of texts that open up to a wide range of different approaches. We will engage in close textual analysis throughout the course while also paying attention to how literature engages the world.

You will also learn research skills, such as searching appropriate databases, distinguishing scholarly sources from other material, how to handle in-text quotations, and MLA style citations. Assignments include an annotated bibliography, a 5 page paper using a secondary source, a midterm and a final exam.


2600-02 | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Somerset, Fiona

2610: Introduction to Digital Humanities

Also offered as DMD 2610. Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2610-1  | Booten, Kyle

"Artificial intelligence." "Data visualization." "Social networks."

At first blush, these terms may not seem to have much to do with reading a poem or a novel. This class is an introduction to the "Digital Humanities," a field that encompasses the often-dramatic ways that digital media are transforming what it means to understand literature and other humanities topics. For instance, computation can allow us to "read" vast numbers of texts in a few minutes or even seconds. Specialized algorithms use statistics to quickly detect linguistic patterns within literary "data sets," patterns that unaided human readers would not likely discern. Techniques of data visualization can then be used to help us understand and communicate these patterns. Human reading itself has also become "digitized," taking place in online spaces that are collaborative, socially-networked, and even game-like.

In this class, small-scale labs will familiarize participants with some of the key pieces of software that we can use to read in new ways. Reading assignments will introduce central questions in the field of Digital Humanities.

While this class will often focus on the use of digital tools to study literature in particular, many of the methodologies it presents will be of use to students across the humanities and even social sciences. No previous technical or computational experience is expected.

Assignments will include reading responses, collaborative lab exercises, and a final paper.

2635E: Literature and the Environment

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

2635E-01 | MWF 12:20-1:10 | Franklin, Wayne

This course will explore some of the ways in which literary works engage with the environmentprimarily the natural environment, but also the city and the social and cultural environments that also define or at least constrain individuals. Reaction papers and a long final essay will provide the main means of evaluation.

We will read eight books, written between the later 19th century and the present that engage different places and employ different literary strategies:

  • Sarah Orne Jewett, The Country of the Pointed Firs and Other Stories (1896)
  • Frank Norris, McTeague: A Story of San Francisco (1899)
  • Kate Chopin, The Awakening (1899)
  • Edith Wharton, Ethan Frome (1911)
  • Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse (1927)
  • O. E. Rölvaag, Giants in the Earth (1927)
  • Norman MacLean, A River Runs through It and Other Stories (1976)
  • Howard Frank Mosher, Where the Rivers Flow North (1978)

3000-Level Courses

3003W: Advanced Expository Writing

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3003W-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Grossman, Leigh

A hands-on approach to writing, the course focuses on composing and revising a longer work in each student's area of interest. Students will be expected to write quickly and effectively, and to learn how to usefully critique other students' workas well as their own. Each student will set writing goals for an approximately 30,000-word project with the instructor at the beginning of the semester, and will be expected to achieve those goals. Between your project and written critiques, expect to write about 150 pages in standard manuscript format over the course of the semester.

3082: Writing Center Practicum

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3082-01 | Hours Arranged | Tonry, Kathleen

3091: Writing Internship

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher. Credit and hours by arrangement, not to exceed six credits per semester. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent required.

3091-01 | Hours Arranged | Fairbanks, Ruth

Writing Internships provide unique opportunities for students to write in non-academic settings in which they are supervised by professional writers. Internships are recognized as an important aspect of undergraduate education and many employers prefer applicants with internship experience. English majors have priority of choice for English 3091, but the course is open to students in other disciplines. Both on-campus and off-campus placements offering a wide variety of professional experiences are available. This is a variable-credit course, and students may elect from one to six credits of training. Grading is on the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory scale. The course may be repeated for credit with no more than eight credits per placement.

Placements have included Cashman & Katz Advertising, Connecticut Landmarks, Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, Globe Pequot Press, Legal Assistance Resource Center of Connecticut, The Dodd Research Center and Archive, Mystic Seaport, New Britain Museum of American Art, UConn Alumni Foundation, UConn School of Pharmacy, UConn Women’s Center, and Von der Mehden Development Office.  Many other placements are available.

See Inda Watrous in CLAS 201B for application materials and review the information packet for additional information.

3117W: Romantic British Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

 3117W-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Igarashi, Yohei

This course is an introduction to British Romantic literature. Though Romanticism was a relatively brief movement (from the later eighteenth century through the early nineteenth century), it was also a momentous one: pivotal in literary history especially for poetry, theories about literature, and the essay form, and of enduring interest for its artistic responses to the beginnings of modernity and political upheaval.

Readings are from the great authors of the periodincluding Jane Austen, William Blake, Lord Byron, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Thomas de Quincey, William Hazlitt, John Keats, Charles Lamb, Mary and Percy Shelley, Charlotte Smith, and William Wordsworthas well as contemporaneous philosophical, political, and scientific writing.

Course requirements: attendance, written assignments, and midterm and final exams.

3120: Irish Literature in English to 1939

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3120-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Burke, Mary

This course will situate Irish drama, prose, and poetry up to the mid-twentieth century in its evolving linguistic, historical, social, political, economic and religious contexts. We will read works by some (but not all) of the following: Brian Merriman, G.B. Shaw, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, W.B. Yeats, Lady Gregory, Elizabeth Bowen, and J.M. Synge. A number of Irish films or films on an Irish theme will be screened during the course. The course is predicated on group discussion. Writing: a practice essay, a mid-term paper, and a final exam.

This class fulfills one of the four courses focusing on Irish Literature or Language required for the Concentration in Irish Literature, which is open to English majors.

3212: Asian American Literature

Also offered as AASI 3212. Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3212-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Kim, Na-Rae

By exploring various artistic productions by Asian Americans, this course seeks to grasp central issues and themes for understanding contemporary Asian America, and furthermore, multicultural America. Asian American literary productions exhibit vibrant re-imagination of American history, nation-state, nationalism, citizenship, identity, and difference.

This course is not a survey of these works, as Asian Americans are a diverse group of people whose literature reflect multiple backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives. Instead, our readings and assignments focus on key themes including: racism, stereotypes, gender expectations, migration, representation, and redefining America. Through this course, we consider how even the seemingly most personal relationships expressed in cultural production are rooted in and shaped by historical and social circumstances.

3218W: Ethnic Literatures of the United States

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3218W-01 | M 2:30-5:00 | Makowsky, Veronica

Honors Section

What is an American? How does ethnicity affect one's sense of identity? How do class, race, sexuality, gender, generation, and location(s) interact with ethnicity to form or challenge identity or to suggest identities contingent upon context?

In addition to these broad questions about ethnicity and identity, this course also considers how movement over time and space (withtin the US, to the US, from the US, and globally) may lead to unstable or fluid senses of identity.

We will read a play, short stories, novels, and autobiographies. The texts encompass Native American works such as Zitkala-Sa's American Indian Stories (excerpts) and Louise Erdrich's The Round House; African American works such as Narrative of the Life of Frederick DouglassAn American Slave, and August Wilson's Fences; and works concerning immigrant experiences including a collection of short stories by Anzia Yezierska, Tina DeRosa's Paper Fish, Julie Otsuka's When the Emperor Was Divine, Edwidge Danticat's Breath, Eyes, Memory, and Noviolet Bulawayo's We Need New Names.

Grades will be based on: active participation in daily discussions, which usually includes in-class writing assignments based on the day's assigned reading; 3 short (2 page) response papers and their revision; and a research paper and its revision (9-10 pages).

3240E: American Nature Writing

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3240E-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | King'oo, Clare

In this course, we will consider the manifold ways in which both the natural environment and human interactions with that environment have been imagined in (mostly, but not exclusively) Anglo-American writing, from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. We will open with the classic writers of “literary natural history” (White, Bartram, Darwin). We will take a tour through the Transcendentalists (Emerson, Thoreau) and the conservationists (Burroughs, Muir), whose “nature writing” adds meditation on personal experience to literary descriptions of natural subjects. And we will conclude with present-day activist authors who have carried the tradition of nature writing into the new territory of “ecocriticism” and “environmental literature” (Abbey, Silko, Williams, McKibben). Along the way, we will pay particular attention to how literature not only represents, but also shapes responses to, pressing environmental concernsfrom deforestation and the loss of wilderness lands, to air pollution, species endangerment, and climate change.

Students will demonstrate their grasp of the material via a range of graded exercises, including several short papers and two timed exams. Attendance at every meeting, as well as participation in our class discussions, will be expected and warmly encouraged.

3303: Studies in Early Literature in English

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

3303-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Marsden, Jean

England and the Beginnings of Empire

Over the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, Britain established colonies around the world, from India to America, the West Indies to Australia. These colonies became the source of much of Britain’s wealth and power, established through trade in spices, exotic goods – and people. The voyages of exploration that occurred during these centuries stirred the imagination of writers and readers, and encounters with foreign worlds and exotic peoples resonated throughout much of English literature.

This class will explore the many ways the growth of England’s empire is reflected in it literature, from the fantastical world of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, to visions of settlements and accounts of voyages, both real and imaginary. As one of the more sinister elements of Britain’s colonial growth was its dependence on the labor of slaves in the West Indies, we will investigate depictions of slavery and the slave trade, paying particular attention to the tensions that grew with the rise of the abolitionist movement in the later eighteenth century.

Reading will include: The Tempest; Behn, Oroonoko; Captain Cook’s voyages; Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe; Swift, Gulliver’s Travels; Cumberland, The West Indian; Colman, Inkle and Yarico; and a collection of travel writings by women.

Assignments: two five-page papers, occasional short writing assignments, class presentations, and a final examination.

3318: Literature and Culture of the Third World

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

3318-01 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Hogan, Patrick

The literary and cultural traditions of China are vast. Clearly, one cannot cover anything even approximating their range in a single course. In this class, we will focus on a few elements of Chinese tradition, exploring them in greater detail. Specifically, the course will begin with a careful reading of Kongzi (Confucius) with perhaps some reference to Laozi and/or Mengzi. We will then work through some Chinese lyric poems, principally following Cai Zong-qi’s How to Read Chinese Poetry. Some of this poetry extends back to the ancient beginnings of Chinese literary tradition. Following this, we will treat a collection of Yuan drama (13th-14th centuries C.E.), focusing on the relation of the works to historical concerns (e.g., Mongol domination and Chinese national identity).

After this, we will consider some prose work. Depending on what is available, this may be the first volume of Cao Xueqin’s Story of the Stone (a.k.a., Dream of the Red Chamber, 18th century) or perhaps some popular story, such as the often-retold tale of “the butterfly lovers,” Liang Shanbo and Zhu Yingtai. The final section of the course will treat one or two works of Chinese cinema (e.g., Xiaoshuai Wang’s Drifters), considering both their thematic concerns and their formal techniques.

Course requirements: mid-term, final, short written responses to the readings, group work, class presentations.

3320: Literature and Culture of India

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to sophomores or higher.

3320-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Mathews, Rebecca

The objective of this course is to offer a passage to India through a selection of representative literary works and films. It provides an overview of ancient as well as contemporary aspirations of a country that is traditionally recognized as the birthplace of numerous religions, philosophy, and great works of literature. In addition, it is now also emerging as a major player in the global economy. The goal of this course is to examine and understand the seeming paradoxes of a country that celebrates diversity even as it successfully synthesizes varied linguistic, religious, cultural and political forces.

As this course involves discussions, quizzes, presentations and written responses, participation in classroom activities is mandatory. Students are expected to read the assigned literature for each class and be prepared for the activities in class. Course requirements include active participation in discussions and presentations, a mid-term exam, in-class writing and a final essay.

3420: Children’s Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

3420-01 | MW 4:40-5:55 | Smith, Victoria Ford

In this course, we will explore a range of children’s literature in English, including fairy tales, picture books, realism, historical fiction, poetry, and graphic narrative. Our task will be to think critically about what these texts tell us about children’s literature as a genre; what literature for young readers reveals about how we understand childhood, including questions of representation and diversity; and how these books participate in larger movements in history, culture, and art. Our course material will range from benchmark texts in the history of the genre, such as J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan, to more recent texts that exemplify the changing landscape of literature for young readers in relation to matters of diversity of representation, such as Alex Gino’s George and Kacen Callender’s Hurricane Child.

Please note that this is not a course on pedagogical strategy. We may touch on the role of children’s literature in education, but we will not be discussing teaching practices. In addition to engaged and thoughtful class participation, students will complete a series of assignments leading to a final research project.

3422: Young Adult Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3422-01 | TuTh 8:00-9:15 | Forbes, Sean

This course examines literary constructions of adolescence. We will explore questions such as, “What constitutes a young adult text?,” “Can or should there be a canon of young adult literature?,” “How does young adult literature cross boundaries of audience and genre?,” “How does young adult literature differ from children’s literature?,” and “How do social and political contexts influence the construction and reception of young adult texts?”

We will investigate issues of collective and individual identity formation, dimensions of young adult texts (like violence and sexuality) that rupture conventions of children’s literature and kindle censorship, and problems of generic boundaries and border crossings. We will pay particular attention to the origins of young adult literature as a genre, as well as to ethnicity and gender in contemporary books. We will be sensitive to the historical and cultural context for each text. Our readings will include critical and theoretical texts in addition to primary sources.

3501: Chaucer

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

3501-01 | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Biggs, Frederick

This course investigates how Chaucer transforms an already stunning literary career and, in should be mentioned, English literature as a whole through his dramatic experiments in the Canterbury Tales.

Readings will include this work in its entirety as well as a selection of sources and analogues for individual tales. Each student will write two papers and take midterm and final exams.

3503: Shakespeare I

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

3503-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Tribble, Evelyn

We will explore Shakespeare’s work through three modes: stage, page, and screen. You will learn to read Shakespeare’s language and how he wrote for the stage; we will use some class time for staging experiments. We will also explore how Shakespeare’s work has been translated into film and how directors use cinematic techniques to convey their interpretations of his work.

Course requirements: An online “promptbook” or journal, in which you will write responses to scenes, reflect upon our staging experiments; analyze adaptations of Shakespeare, and show your ability to read and analyze texts; a midterm and a final in which you demonstrate your ability to interpret Shakespeare on page, stage, and screen; an essay on an individual play; and an “unessay,” in which you connect your own interests with the plays of Shakespeare.

Plays we will read: Much Ado about Nothing, Henry IV, Part 1, Merry Wives of Windsor (to be confirmed); Hamlet and/or King Lear; The Winter’s Tale

3509: Studies in Individual Writers

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3509-01 | Tu 5:00-7:30 | Barreca, Regina

Virginia Woolf and Margaret Atwood

This new course, designed for students who are strong readers and writers, focuses on the fiction and non-fiction of two of the greatest authors writing in English during the last hundred years. Virginia Woolf and Margaret Atwood changed the way we approach literature. They’re smart, funny, provocative and fierce; their prose takes no prisoners. We’ll be reading the following works: by Woolf, Women and Writing; The Voyage Out; Orlando; The Haunted House & Other Short Stories and by Atwood, selected short stories (to be announced); Cat's Eye; The Robber Bride; and Alias Grace.

Strict attendance policy; frequent in-class writings; take-home mid-term and final.

3601: The English Language

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3601-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Biggs, Frederick

The goal of this course is to improve the students’ writing and, as a collateral benefit, their ability to teach this subject to others by explaining key elements of the grammatical structure of English. The text, Rodney Huddleston and Geoffrey K. Pullum’s A Student’s Introduction to English Grammar (Cambridge: CUP, 2005) provides a detailed account of many of the rules that control the language. It is an essential starting-point for linguists. Our focus, however, is slightly different: the rules that underlie related syntactic structures which allow for revision.

Take this somewhat grim example: loss of blood threatened his life. This sentence can be derived from two independent clauses: he lost blood and his life was threatened. But how exactly are they related? Sign up and find out: it may save if not your life your GPA.

This course will consist of lectures, exercises, blog posts, and tests. Students will also submit a five-slide powerpoint on a topic related to the English language.

3605: Latina/o Literature

Also offered as LLAS 3233. Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011 or with instructor consent. Open to juniors or higher.

3605-01 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Sanchez, Lisa

This course is an introduction to literatures of communities considered “Latino” in the U.S. This nomenclature is highly contested and often misunderstood. For literary historians, Latinas and Latinos refer to American citizens living in regions annexed by the U.S., through warfare, in the nineteenth century (primarily the Northern Mexican territories in 1848 and Puerto Rico in 1898) and their descendants, wherever they live in the U.S. The term also includes migrants to the U.S. from Latin America during the twentieth century, whether they are U.S. citizens, residents, guest workers, or denizens. Latinos are a heterogeneous group; some are of European descent, some are of African descent, some are of Native American descent, some are of Asian descent, and some are of a mix of these and other regional, national, ethnic, or religious identities. What unites Latinos as a group is that the U.S. government, the U.S. mainstream media, and U.S. popular culture tend to mark them as a distinct ethnic group. Latino studies critically addresses the character and history of that marking.

Our main focus this semester is to explore classic texts in the Puerto Rican diaspora’s literary tradition, including the study of figures like Pura Belpré, Arturo Schomburg, Luisa Capetillo, Jesús Colón, and William Carlos Williams. Our task is not to evaluate how “authentically” these texts may or may not represent Latino culture, but to explore them as art; that is, as literary and historical texts motivated by the aesthetic and ethical inspiration of those who write them and those who read them.

This course is a study of a subaltern American literary tradition. Students will learn how and why the aesthetic, cultural, historical, geographical, and ethical complexities of this body of writing matter to contemporary readers.

Students who would like to enroll in this upper division course before their junior year should e-mail the professor to request a permission number: Lisa.M.Sanchez@uconn.edu. Please provide your reasons for wanting to take the course.

3611: Women’s Literature 1900 to the Present

Also offered as WGSS 3611. Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3611-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Breen, Margaret

This is an exciting course not only because of the texts we’ll be reading but because of the ones we’ll come away wanting to read. We will be focusing on a selection of significant texts that, written by women during the last ninety years, reflect a variety of cultural contexts. In addition to the novels and essays, we will also be reading and discussing a range of short pieces (short stories, poems, and essays). Our course texts are important because of both the stories they tell (stories regarding alienation, coming-of-age, resilience, resistance, violence, memory, and forgetting) and the ways in which those stories are told (ways regarding narrative technique, point of view, plot construction, metaphor, and so on). Two in-class essay exams, a group presentation, and a 6-8- page essay.

Likely texts include the following:

  • Virginia Woolf: A Room of One’s Own (1929)
  • Alice Walker: “In Search of Our Mother’s Gardens” (1972)
  • Nella Larsen: Passing (1929)
  • Nawal El Saadawai: Memoirs from the Women’s Prison (1983)
  • Adrienne Rich: “Notes toward a Politics of Location” (1984)
  • Audre Lorde: “The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House” (1984)
  • Sandra Cisneros: The House on Mango Street (1984)
  • Toni Morrison: Beloved (1987)
  • Dorothy Allison: Bastard Out of Carolina (1992)
  • Judith Butler: “Imitation and Gender Insubordination” (1991)
  • Sarah Waters: Tipping the Velvet (1998); Judith Halberstam: “Introduction,” The Queer Art of Failure (2011)
  • Casey Plett: Little Fish (2018)

3613: Introduction to LGBT Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3613-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Brush, Julia

This course will consider the foundational, the fragmentary, and the emergent texts and practices that comprise contemporary LGBTQ+ literature in the United States and beyond. Against the backdrop of current gender and sexuality activism, this course interrogates historical and counter-historical texts in conversation with the potentials of our roles as readers, critics, and scholars.

Specifically, this course looks at the genres, practices, receptions, and traditions that make up the canons and anti-canons of LGBTQ+ lit in order to ask these questions: how do sexuality, gender identity, desire, and embodiment manifest and challenge literary forms? How can literary representations and productions enact political, social, and interpersonal dissent or acquiescence to existing power structures? Whose lives and bodies are valued in these texts and who is ignored or sidelined? How can we enter into conversation with these writers and artists to reconfigure value within the academy and beyond?

Texts and authors we will encounter include:

  • The diaries of Anne Lister and Sally Wainwright’s adaptation Gentleman Jack
  • Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home
  • Saeed Jones
  • Ocean Vuong
  • Franny Choi
  • Hieu Minh Nguyen
  • Michael Cunningham’s The Hours
  • Tarrell Alvin McCraney and Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight
  • James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room
  • Jeffrey Eugenides’ Middlesex
  • Rita Mae Brown’s Rubyfruit Jungle
  • Audre Lorde’s Zami: A New Spelling of My Name
  • Jia Qing Wilson-Yang’s Small Beauty
  • Joshua Whitehead’s Jonny Appleseed

Assignments will include: two in-class exams and two researched projects of critical or creative writing in addition to weekly readings, presentations, and discussions.

3621: Literature and Other Disciplines

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

Literature & Film, Sense of Place
3621 | This course is being offered online. | Plum, Sydney

This offering of the interdisciplinary course will focus more closely on what writers and filmmakers have been telling us about environmental instability — its causes and current as well as potential impact. We’ll use an ecocritical approach to overlap studies of aesthetics, history, culture, biology and biodiversity, economy, climate change, and legal and ethical contexts. Students will read and respond to four novels and several short works of literary nonfiction. Works of literature are complemented by five or six feature-length films, which are available to stream. Students will create journals to develop an individual sense of place and will research current and potential environmental change in their known places.

The films we study are not transpositions of the novels but develop similar themes. It is often the case that the films are rated R for violence, disturbing images, and language. Even films rated PG have some disturbing images. Often the novels selected include scenes of violence, sometimes sexual violence. The human relationship with the environment always has been shaped by violence, which is reflected in these narratives.

This course is presented entirely online, and there are no synchronous meetings. Grades are based upon thoughtful participation in discussions, short writings, journal submissions, a midterm examination and a final project.

3623: Studies in Literature and Culture

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic.

3623-01 | Tu 3:30-6:30 | Sibelman, Grae

Holocaust print, theatre, and film.

How do your represent the unimaginable? As daunting of a task as this is, the Holocaust is one of the most dramatized and written about events in history for the amount of time since its passing. In this course we will be examining the means by which authors and directors have attempted to represent the Holocaust. We will discuss what tools were used including choices made in written structure, visual imagery, and the use of language in an attempt to capture the essence of the Holocaust and explore its deeper meaning and societal repercussions. As well as examining both dramatic works and films that depict the Holocaust we will read first-hand accounts and watch documentaries in order to broaden our knowledge of the Holocaust so that we can better reflect upon the statements being made in the representations. We will also be reading a large body of criticism relating both the dramatization of the Holocaust and the Holocaust itself.

Some of the works being studied in the class include; Akropolis by Jerzy Grotowski, Endgame by Samuel Beckett, The Deputy by Rolf Hochhuth, Who Will Carry the World by Charlotte Delbo and Ghetto by Joshua Sobel as well as many others. We will also be examining films including Ida directed by Pawel Pawlikowski, The Pianist directed by Roman Polansky, and Amen directed by Costa-Gavras.

The coursework will include: brief quizzes on the reading, turning in mid-term and final papers, as well as preparing a presentation for the class. This will be a discussion based class, and as such, class participation is also considered to be a part of the coursework.

3629: Introduction to Holocaust Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3629-01 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Breen, Margaret

What does it mean to create art from the ashes? In studying literature of the Holocaust we will explore how trauma shapes identity and consider the commitment to write: to document the unspeakable. We will engage a variety of genres, including essay, memoir, poetry, fiction, and documentary film. All of these share an absolute imperative – at times even a compulsion – to tell their story. If is true, as Elie Weisel claims, that at Auschwitz not only man died but the idea of man, how do we now conceive of the human? How do we survive? As reader-listeners, we witness the human spirit’s drive to remember and be remembered. One 5-7-page midterm essay; one hourly exam; one 10-page final essay.

Likely texts include the following:

  • Wiesel’s Night
  • Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz
  • Tec’s Dry Tears
  • Frank’s Diary of a Young Girl
  • Delbo’s Auschwitz and After
  • Desbois’s Holocaust by Bullets
  • Ida Fink’s short story collection A Scrap of Time.

Films/documentaries: Night and Fog, Shoah, and Weapons of the Spirit

3640: British Cinema

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher.

3640-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Semenza, Gregory

In this course, we will trace the long and colorful history of British film since the invention of the cinema around 1895 until the present day. One of the original powers of the global film industryalong with the US, Germany, France, and Italythe British cinema experienced serious decline in the early years of World War I. Although, according to some film historians, it has never fully recovered, the British filmmaking industry has in fact been at the forefront of numerous historical innovations and developments: it has served important roles in the rise of documentary film and cinematic realism, as well as the wartime propaganda film; it has been central to the evolution of the horror film, heritage cinema and the movie franchise; and, especially, it has played a large part in the history of film adaptations of literature.

Through all these changes, the British film industry has always been linked closely to Hollywood, serving not only a training ground for directorial and acting talent (from Charlie Chaplin to Alfred Hitchcock to Emma Thompson and Florence Pugh), but also as an important site and collaborator in an increasingly multinational film industry (from The Bridge on the River Kwai to the James Bond and the Harry Potter franchises). This course will consider all of these contributions within the context of questions about Britishness itself and, more specifically, the ways in which evolving British identity influences, and is influenced by, the movies.

Key films are likely to include:

  • Carol Reed’s The Third Man
  • Tony Richardson’s Look Back in Anger
  • Danny Boyle’s Trainspotting
  • Lynne Ramsay’s Ratcatcher
  • Christopher Morris’s Four Lions
  •  Joanna Hogg’s The Souvenir.

Spotlighted filmmakers are likely to include: David Lean, Powell and Pressburger, Alfred Hitchcock, the Hammer Horror team, Merchant-Ivory, the Monty Python team, and Andrea Arnold, among others.

This film counts toward the UConn Film Minor requirements.

3695: Special Topics – Writing with Algorithms

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher. May be repeated for credit with a change in content.

3695-01 | Booten, Kyle

How do you program a computer to write a poem? Literary-minded programmers have been providing answers to this question almost as long as there have been computers. This course is an introduction to programming with the popular and versatile computer language Python; it is also a kind of creative writing workshop. The first part of the course will take the form of a series of technical labs introducing Python and exploring ways that it can be used to generate (literary) language. In the second part of the course, participants will share and discuss their own works of computer-generated literature. 

This course is designed for those who have no prior programming experience. For many, programming "poetry bots" can be an engaging way to learn to code. However, this course is also an opportunity to think critically about the relationship between computation and creativity. 

In addition to frequent coding labs and two workshop submissions, there will be a midterm. 

3699: Independent Study

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic. Instructor consent required.

1.00 - 6.00 credits | Hours arranged

Supervised reading and writing on a subject of special interest to the student. Students interested in pursuing an independent study must contact instructors with whom they wish to work directly to receive approval and discuss plans.

3701: Creative Writing II

Prerequisite: ENGL 1701. May be repeated once for credit. Instructor consent required.

3701-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Litman, Ellen

In this class, we will focus on fiction and creative nonfiction. We will be reading and discussing short stories, novels, and essays by contemporary authors in order to understand the many ways in which fiction and creative nonfiction can be written. Students will be required to produce original work in both genres, which we’ll workshop in class. Additionally, students will complete a series of exercises and attend several readings on campus and write reviews.

Consent of instructor required. E-mail ellen.litman@uconn.edu.


3701-02 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Cohen, Bruce

The class will be a poetry and prose poetry writing workshop. It is designed for students who have a serious and committed interest in writing and discussing poetry. We will be reading and analyzing five books of poems and will be unraveling the craft and esthetics design of the various poets. We will also dissect the differences between poetry & prose poetry. Naturally, students will be required to produce original work and actively participate in the writing workshop in class. Aside from attending campus readings, students will be asked to research outside writers and share work with the class. It is assumed that all students have taken English 1701 and have an active vocabulary and understanding of poetry.

The class is by permission only and students will be asked to submit poems for consideration for entrance into the class.

3703: Writing Workshop

Prerequisite: ENGL 1701. May be repeated once for credit. Instructor consent required.

3703-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Forbes, Sean

Advanced Poetry

This seminar is designed for upper-level undergraduate students interested in writing poetry, and as such it will require a great deal of writing, reading, and revising. Students will write 5-6 poems and complete a series of exercises. The final project will involve preparing two of the three original pieces to be submitted for publication. Texts will likely include two full-length poetry collections and one poetry chapbook plus some essays on the craft of poetry. Active class participation is required.

For a permission number, please e-mail 3-5 pages of your poetry as a .doc or .pdf attachment to Professor Forbes at sean.forbes@uconn.edu. 

 

3711: Creative Writing for Child and Young Adult Readers

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to sophomores or higher.

3711-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Dennigan, Darcie

In 1977, at a conference on children's literature at UC Berkeley, June Jordan gave a lecture in which she declared, "Love is lifeforce... Love is opposed to the death of the dream. Love is opposed to the delimiting of possibilities of experience." Here we are now in 2020, struggling to sustain the human species and more than ever we need books that write new worlds and possibilities into existence. Let's do it. Each week you'll write in and outside of class.

Assignments include: poetry, two picture books, a nonfiction picture book, an epistolary book, and the first chapter of a YA novel. You need not be artist-- illustrations aren't required-- but of course artists are warmly welcomed.

Graded assignments include: midterm portfolio and a final project (3 short manuscripts or 3 chapters of a YA novel).

Expect to contribute to a supportive and rigorous class atmosphere. Class engagement is crucial.

We'll look at books by: Ruth Krauss, Jacqueline Woodson, Cathy G. Johnson, Barbara Cooney, Chris Raschka, Oge Mora, Eleanor Estes, Hernan del Solar, and many others.

For first years and sophomores who wish to take the class: please email darcie.dennigan@uconn.

3715E: Nature Writing Workshop

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to sophomores or higher. Recommended preparation: ENGL 1701.

3715-01 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Dennigan, Darcie

Interdependence Day

This is a studio-based creative writing course. Expect to write abundantly in and outside of class about and from your position in the Anthropocene, our current era, which Joyelle McSweeney describes as "registering human-kind’s ravaging impact on non-human species and environments... a single outsize permanent catastrophe made up of component catastrophes..." Be prepared for nonlinear, challenging writing assignments, and for invitations to meet a blank page without constraints. One piece of literal garbage will be the lynchpin of all your writing this semester. How are you inextricably linked to this piece of trash? What is the loop you're living? How are you continuously fed back into this loop? How are you linked to rocks, grass, a thumbtack, frozen iguanas, the person on your floor who never leaves their room?

Expect to discuss your own writing in small and large group workshops, to do writing experiments outside and in the greenhouse, and to have your semester culminate in an extended writing project that imaginatively considers the concept of interdependence. Expect readings, mostly from contemporary writers finding their own words and futures in the Anthropocene, and to respond to those works in critical response posts and in class.

Work by Kate Schapira, Hiromi Ito, Maryam Parhizkar, Henry David Thoreau, Francis Ponge, Ross Gay, John Cage, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Zoe Leonard, Gabby Bellot, and more.

4000-Level Courses

4201W: Advanced Study – American Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. At least 12 credits of 2000-level or above English courses or consent of instructor. Open to juniors or higher. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

4201W-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Eby, Clare

The Human Costs of Capitalism

In the United States, business interests reign supreme and largely unquestioned. That's partly because capitalism has been marketed as "free enterprise" (and who wants to stand against freedom?), partly because competition is understood to be a fair and impartial system for delivering consumers the best goods at the cheapest price. But when freedom itself is defined in terms of profit and loss, what happens to less quantifiable, and perhaps more fundamental, types of freedom? Why do pundits keep praising competition in an era of endless corporate consolidations which clearly decrease competition among firms? Most important, what are the human costs of letting capitalism define American identity? Does the concept of citizenship still apply, or are we only consumers?

This capstone seminar looks at contemporary literature that engages disturbing economic trends such as income inequality, the expansion of corporate personhood (by which corporations enjoy many of the rights of citizens), job insecurity, and the challenges to privacy and personal identity in the face of increasing quantification and new technologies.

Literary readings will probably include:

  • Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake
  • Gary Shteyngart's Super Sad True Love Story
  • Chang-Rae Lee's On Such a Full Sea
  • Mohsin Hamid's The Reluctant Fundamentalist
  • Richard Powers’s Gain
  • Helen Phillips’s The Beautiful Bureaucrat.

To develop a vocabulary for discussing these timely issues, we will also read a number of entries in Keywords for American Cultural Studies, and other secondary sources. We will also spend time on Citizens United (2010), a much-publicized Supreme Court consolidating corporate personhood.

Course requirements: one 5-6 page paper, one 8-10 page research paper, one presentation, and lots of class discussion. Please note that discussion is 20% of the final grade; for the silent types, this course is not a good fit.

4203W: Advanced Study – Ethnic Literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. At least 12 credits of 2000-level or above English courses or consent of instructor. Open to juniors or higher. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

4203W-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Sanchez, Lisa

Apocalyptic Ethnic American Literature

For some cultural and historical reason, there has been a proliferation of apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction, film, plastic arts, and music in the past five decades, and in the current moment it is a hugely popular genre. Writers around the world, from Laguna Pueblo lands to Shanxi, have appropriated this genre to explore alternate futures for the planet. Some of it is dismal (dystopian). Some of it is hopeful (utopian). All of it is a prophetic offering to our most creative impulses to change the world for the better before it’s too late or to embrace the “revelation” (which is what an apocalypse is) because the new world order (or galactic in some cases) will be better than the old one.

This course explores all manner of apocalyptica and post-apocalyptica in ethnic American literature. Students will read, view, and listen to some of the most compelling and popular titles in this genre.

The texts we will study this term are:

  • Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler
  • Marrow Thieves by Cherrie Dimaline
  • The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin
  • Almanac of the Dead by Leslie Marmon Silko
  • Octavia’s Brood, eds Brown and Imarisha.

Together in class we will also develop a short filmography and discography for discussion.

4965W: Advanced Studies in Early Literature in English

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011 or 3800. At least 12 credits of 2000-level or above English courses or consent of instructor. Open to juniors or higher. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

4965W-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Mahoney, Charles

Romantic Shakespeare

The period we now denominate Romanticism (1785-1834) redefined the way we think about Shakespeare. In terms of revisions, productions, and criticisms of Shakespeare’s plays, this epoch made Shakespeare modern. And the criticism of Shakespeare from this period remains unsurpassed. This seminar will examine six of Shakespeare’s greatest plays (Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Othello, Hamlet, King Lear, and The Tempest), paying attention both to the Folio texts and those revisions and prompt-texts used on the Romantic stage.

Additionally, we will attend to the accounts of certain key actors and actresses on the Romantic stage (e.g., John Philip Kemble, Sarah Siddons, Edmund Kean) and, most importantly, the writings of a number of important Romantic critics (e.g., Samuel Taylor Coleridge, August Wilhelm Schlegel, William Hazlitt, Elizabeth Inchbald, Thomas de Quincey, Charles Lamb). Familiarity with Shakespeare’s plays is encouraged but not required.

Likely course requirements: regular attendance and participation; one class presentation; two 5-7 page essays; one 10-12 page research paper (with prospectus).


4965W-02 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Marsden, Jean