Fall 2021 Course Descriptions: Storrs Campus

Fall 2021


Each semester the faculty for the Department of English provide course descriptions that build upon the University's catalog descriptions. These individually crafted descriptions provide information about variable topics, authors, novels, texts, writing assignments, and whether instructor consent is required to enroll. The details, along with reviewing the advising report, will help students select course options that best meet one's interests and academic requirements.

The following list includes Undergraduate courses that are sequenced after the First-Year Writing requirement and will change each semester.

Honors Courses

Honors courses are limited to fifteen to twenty students in each section. They are open only to Honors students or with the consent of the instructor. This semester, we are offering:


1601W-03 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Knapp, Kathy (HB)

It was the cultural theorists Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer who in 1947 coined the term “culture industry” to condemn the films, radio programs, magazines, and novels that they argued were complicit in maintaining the existing power structure. Dull and formulaic, they argued, these cultural products advanced the white heteronormative suburban family as an ideal suburban family as an ideal to which their mass audiences should aspire. On the one hand, the image of a nuclear family headed by a breadwinner father and maintained by a stay-at-home mother seems obsolete: the social transformations of the past several decades have led to more women in the workforce than men and to our first black president--cultural shifts that have been duly celebrated in popular film, television, print, and social media. And still, racism and sexism not only persist but thrive. This course will look at recent films, television, fiction, philosophy, and nonfiction (possibilities include Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye and Jordan Peele's  Get Out among other texts) that historicize and critique the culture industry’s role in maintaining white male supremacy even as it touts diversity and equality. This being a “W” course, you will not only think critically about the construction of race and gender, you will create your own cultural products that challenge these handed-down assumptions. The aim of this course, in other words,  is not only to develop and hone your critical reading, writing and thinking skills in relation to the material on the syllabus, but to provide you with a framework and tools for being thoughtful lifelong readers, writers, thinkers, and citizens.

2407-04 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Burke, Mary

This course will concentrate on short stories by American and international authors. Students will sample a broad spectrum of short stories illustrating a particular style, era, national tradition, or theme and will learn how to read with careful critical attention. Coursework will consist of a practice essay, a midterm long-format paper, response papers, group discussion, and a final assessment. 

2605-01 | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Eby, Clare

We’ll read some of capitalism’s most influential theorists (such as Adam Smith and Karl Marx) and look at some of its most ardent defenders (such as Milton Friedman and Ayn Rand). The primary focus, however, will be on twentieth- and twenty-first century novels and a few films that raise questions about whether capitalism is the best, much less the inevitable, way of structuring the economy—and so many other aspects of life. We will consider if there is a racial component to capitalism and also the possibility of a new form of surveillance capitalism emerging in the digital age. The reading list for this course is still a work in progress, but will likely include such novels as Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Dave Eggers’s The Circle, Colson Whitehead’s Zone One, and Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Dispossessed. In addition to a substantial amount of reading, course requirements include a 15-minute presentation on a full scholarly book, a short paper, a research paper, spot quizzes—and lots of lively discussion.

I expect there will be plenty of room for non-honors students with a strong academic record and writing skills. If you are interested, feel free to inquire about the course (clare.eby@uconn.edu), though I won’t be able to give out permission numbers until after honors students’ scheduled enrollment appointments

 

1000-Level Courses

1101W: Classical and Medieval Western Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

1101W-01 | MWF 9:05-9:55 | Gallucci, Mary 
1101W-02 | TuTh 5:00-6:15 | Sanchez, Lisa 

This course is a survey of the western literary tradition that evolved around the Mediterranean basin during the archaic, ancient, classical and medieval periods (ca. 2000 BC to ca. 1500 AD) and then spread to the four winds via translation as masterworks of early western (hemispheric) civilization. Our study spans over three millennia of literary history and highlights the texts and traditions that have most influenced our understanding of the modern world.

1103W: Renaissance and Modern Western Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

1103W-01 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Wold, Julia 

Writers of the Renaissance were deeply invested in developing how narratives and literary art forms could portray concepts of justice and revenge, good and evil. Therefore, this course will explore literature from and from the Renaissance and Modern periods throughout Western literature, with a specific focus on these concepts. We will explore these concepts through various genres and mediums including drama, short stories, novels, etc., approximately 6 works in total.

Requirements include: in-class reading/viewing responses; two essays of revised prose, approximately 15 pages in total.

Works to be read may include: a tragedy from Shakespeare, The Duchess of Malfi, Paradise Lost, various short stories, Beloved, among others.

1201: Introduction to American Studies

Prerequisites: None.


1201-01 | MWF 11:15-12:05 | Testa, Richard 

What does it mean to be American? This course introduces ways of examining the United States while investigating significant historical and contemporary events and popular culture. How has America imagined itself through its history and culture? How does America imagine itself today? Students will also be introduced to the practice of American Studies; the course is designed to teach students to critically analyze United States culture and society. 

Note: topics for this semester will include racism in post-Civil War America, baseball, and private detective novels.

1503: Introduction to Shakespeare

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

1503-01| TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Semenza, Gregory 

"The remarkable thing about Shakespeare is that he is really very good, in spite of all the people who say he is very good." -- Robert Graves

After more than 20 years of teaching and studying Shakespeare, I still marvel at how good he really is. My major goal in this introductory class is simply to share some of the things I've learned about his plays over the years, and to explore with you the reasons why his artistry continues to influence and move us 400 years after his death. My more technical goal is to instill appreciation and understanding of the following: the major Shakespearean dramatic genres, comedy, tragedy, and history; the chief characteristics of Shakespeare's dramatic style:

systematic indeterminacy, pervasive metatheatricality, and dialectical structuring; the basic terms and devices of Shakespearean drama, including soliloquy, aside, play-within-the-play, and exposition; the major characters, such as Hamlet, Lear, and Juliet; and the major dramatic themes, including nature vs. nurture, fate and freewill, and sacred and profane love.

A final focus of this course will be on Shakespeare’s cultural legacy. Looking critically and theoretically at engagements of Shakespeare in scholarship, corporate business practices, educational curricula, music, television, and film, we will ask the question “Why Shakespeare?” That is, how and why has the “cultural capital” of Shakespeare been evoked since at least the publication of the First Folio in 1623? More specifically, how has Shakespeare been presented to the masses in terms of sexuality, gender, race, violence, and nationalism? What happens when Shakespeare is transplanted into a non-British or non-western context? What happens when Shakespeare’s name is evoked in lowbrow entertainment or appropriated in popular culture forms? What can the serious study of reception, adaptation, appropriation, and other such engagements teach us about Shakespeare and his considerable influence?

You’ll read about seven plays, participate in lively class discussions, take a midterm and a final, and write a few short papers.

1601W: Race, Gender, and the Culture Industry

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

1601W-01 | TuTh 8:00-9:15 | Phillips, Jerry
1601W-02 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Phillips, Jerry
1601W-03 | TuTh 11:o0-12:15 | Knapp, Kathy (HB)

Honors

It was the cultural theorists Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer who in 1947 coined the term “culture industry” to condemn the films, radio programs, magazines, and novels that they argued were complicit in maintaining the existing power structure. Dull and formulaic, they argued, these cultural products advanced the white heteronormative suburban family as an ideal suburban family as an ideal to which their mass audiences should aspire. On the one hand, the image of a nuclear family headed by a breadwinner father and maintained by a stay-at-home mother seems obsolete: the social transformations of the past several decades have led to more women in the workforce than men and to our first black president--cultural shifts that have been duly celebrated in popular film, television, print, and social media. And still, racism and sexism not only persist but thrive. This course will look at recent films, television, fiction, philosophy, and nonfiction (possibilities include Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye and Jordan Peele's  Get Out among other texts) that historicize and critique the culture industry’s role in maintaining white male supremacy even as it touts diversity and equality. This being a “W” course, you will not only think critically about the construction of race and gender, you will create your own cultural products that challenge these handed-down assumptions. The aim of this course, in other words,  is not only to develop and hone your critical reading, writing and thinking skills in relation to the material on the syllabus, but to provide you with a framework and tools for being thoughtful lifelong readers, writers, thinkers, and citizens.

1616: Major Works of English & American Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

1616-01| TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Fairbanks, Ruth 

This course will focus on the idea of the hero figure, consideration of the hero’s predicaments, and emerging perspectives about the hero persona and identity in British and American Literature. Readings will include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Othello, Sense and Sensibility, Wuthering Heights, a selection of Hawthorne’s short fiction, The Turn of the Screw, Dubliners, Saint Joan.

Course Requirements: Response Essays/Quizzes, midterm, final.

2000-Level Courses

2001: Introduction to Grant Proposal Writing

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2001-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Courtmanche, Jason 

Grant Writing will introduce you to the basics of grants and grant writing.  It is open to students from all majors.  We will explore your research interests, develop a proposal, identify possible sources of funding, review Requests for Proposals (RFPs), review successfully awarded grant proposals, talk with grant writers and other professionals who work in the field, and, finally, write, revise, and ultimately submit a grant proposal.

We will mostly explore opportunities available to students through the Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR), such as IDEA, SHARE, and SURF grants, and we will have guest speakers from OUR, the grants division of the CLAS Business Services Center, the UConn Foundation, and the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP), as well as fellow undergraduates who have been successful in their pursuit of grants.  I will also try to connect students to faculty members with related interests.

Students in this course will engage in a lot of hands-on work—conducting research, working in small groups to share ideas, reading grant proposals as mentor texts, drafting and revising the texts of your own proposals, and giving and receiving feedback on your ideas and proposals.

There will be regularly collected and assessed writing assignments specific to each grant, but due dates may vary depending on the deadlines prescribed by the differing RFPs being pursued by members of the class.

In addition to the work of writing a grant, I will expect you to keep a weekly journal in which you write about the process.  These journals will be where you take notes, explore ideas, draft your proposals, and reflect upon the process.  I will collect and respond to these at key points throughout the course.

2013W: Introduction to Writing Studies

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2013W-01 | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Healy, Daniel

Writing studies, rhet-comp, composition-rhetoric— there is a growing list of names that we can use to refer to the study of writing itself. Communications, media studies, linguistics, and literature exist to explore and explain some aspects of written language. But what does expertise in writing studies look like? How can writing studies knowledge be used to support work across academic disciplines, across career paths, and in composition classrooms to prepare the next generation of writers? ENGL 2013W is a class that seeks to explore a brief history of writing (and teaching writing) in colleges and universities before survey the rise and growth of writing studies into a vibrant academic discipline all its own. After getting to know a few of the diverse fields of work available to scholars of rhetoric and composition scholars, 2013W students will pursue original research projects to deepen their own specific knowledge and practice within discipline. Readings will range widely, from historical and microhistorical accounts of American writing and rhetoric, to important NCTE and CCCC documents from the past and present, and studies on contemporary digital writing practice, multimodality, and translingual code-meshing.

2013W-02 | MWF 12:20-1:10 | Healy, Daniel 

See description above.

2049W: Writing Through Research

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2049W-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Menrisky, Alexander

Writing Through Research is intended for students in all majors and fulfills one of the W requirements at the University of Connecticut. During the semester, we will consider (and apply to our own writing) the scope and limitations of originality in research and writing, the differences between primary and secondary research, and the relationship between our own written arguments and the arguments made by other writers before us. The first part of the course is devoted to working together as a class on a research project on the subject of homeor place in order to practice the elements of research, including how to develop a research question, find sources to guide this exploration, engage sources, develop a first draft, and revise this draft. The rest of the course is devoted to applying this methodology. Students will develop and explore an individual research question relevant to their relationship to place, which will culminate in a large-scale research paper.

2100: British Literature I

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2100-01| MWF 12:20-1:10 | Codr, Dwight 
2100-02| TuTh 5:00-6:15 | Gouws, Dennis 

This lecture course surveys British literature from the medieval period through the 18th century. Intended to provide preparation for more advanced courses in British literature, ENGL2100 is strongly recommended for English majors. This is a group-one general-education course.

2101: British Literature II

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2101-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Ford Smith, Victoria 

This survey familiarizes the students with British authors from the nineteenth to early twentieth century. Readings cover a wide variety of genres including the novel, poetry, essay, short story, and drama. In addition to paying attention to genre and literary movements — an endeavor that will involve close attention to texts’ formal elements — we will explore the ways authors represent and respond to their historical, cultural, and political contexts, discussing topics such as nature, art, industrialization, class, nationalism, imperialism, gender, sexuality, science, and war. Throughout, we will examine literature alongside other literary and artistic forms, including newspaper articles, legislation, painting, photography, and the industrial arts. Authors may include Mary Wollstonecraft, John Keats, William Blake, Jane Austen, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, Thomas Hardy, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, and W. B. Yeats, among others. Course texts will include an anthology, one or two supplementary novels, and readings made available online. In addition to a demanding reading schedule, students will be responsible for engaged class participation, two short (3- to 4-page) papers, and a final research project with proposal.

2101-02 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Burke, Mary (HB)

In this survey course, we will explore British literature from the early nineteenth century to the present day across genres, authors, movements, styles, and themes. We will read canonical texts to ask how they explored the social, cultural, and political issues of their times but also trace a tradition of marginalized voices emanating from the United Kingdom’s geographical and ideological peripheries. Our readings will emphasize how such works successively reinforced and challenged mainstream British identity and values. Intended to provide preparation for more advanced courses in British literature, ENGL2101 is strongly recommended for English majors. Requirements: one short draft essay, one long paper, and one class presentation. 

2200: Literature and Culture of North America Before 1800

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2200-01 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Franklin, Wayne 

This course examines the early written and oral record of the area that eventually became the United States. It does so within the context of various non-textual analogues (e.g., architecture, art, landscape, material culture, and social, economic, and political institutions). The goal is to achieve a holistic understanding of the ways in which peoples of many varied backgrounds, from the Asian-derived indigenous inhabitants of North America to the various immigrant populations from continental Europe and the British Isles and the enslaved Africans they introduced to the Western hemisphere, came to express their views of the land and their experiences on it and with each other. Primary readings are drawn from recorded Indigenous mythic and historic texts, travel accounts originally written in various European languages (e.g., French, Spanish, Dutch, German, and English), works centered on indigenous-Euro-American contact and conflict, social history documents of literary value, key political documents, and poetry, early fiction and autobiography. Reaction papers on major texts and a reading journal on the final two texts will be required.

2201: American Literature to 1880

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2201-01| TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Salvant, Shawn 

This discussion-based course provides a selected survey of key works and authors in American literature from the transatlantic and colonial eras through the post-Civil War period.  Students will learn about the development of American literature during the nineteenth century with emphasis on issues of race, gender, and class as forces in shaping the American literary tradition.  We will examine : Native American oral and literary traditions; transatlantic African American writing; European American colonial writing; African American anti-slavery speeches and slave narratives; the American Renaissance and American Transcendentalism; mid-to-late nineteenth-century American novels.  Major figures may include James Gronniosaw, William Bradford, Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Henry David Thoreau, Solomon Northup, Herman Melville, Sojourner Truth among others.  Primary texts will be supplemented by scholarly secondary readings and current articles.  Lectures are minimal; class discussion will be our main method.  Final grade based on quizzes, discussion question assignments, midterm exam, participation, 1-2 short essays, final paper and/or a final exam.

2201W: American Literature to 1880

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.


2201W-01| TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Reynolds, John
2201W-02| TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Begg, Leah
Close reading and critical study of the major themes in American literature from contact to 1880. May include such authors as Winthrop, Bradstreet, Franklin, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Douglass, Dickinson, and Twain. This course is strongly recommended for English majors.

2203W: American Literature Since 1880

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2203W-01| TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Goldman, Eric

Modern Transitions and Transformations in American Literature and Culture 

The class will explore American literary Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Authors will include Twain, Crane, Jewett, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hurston, Morrison, and others. The late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries were periods of extremely rapid transformations of American life. In our discussions, we will consider how American literature of this period prompts us to consider the effects of some of the key transformative features of modernity: the introduction of new technology to daily life; industrialized warfare; manmade environmental change; shifting race and gender relations; and the exponentially accelerating pace of modern life.

Students must come prepared for each class with reading notes, complete writing exercises, write and revise three papers, and demonstrate mastery of key terms and concepts in a final examination.

2203W-02| TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Courtmanche, Jason 

The abuse of privilege, the arbitrary exercise of power, the stoking of prejudice for personal advantage. Of course I’m describing some of the major themes of the works we will be reading, discussing, and writing about in this section of American Literature Since 1880.

Building on transactional theories of reading and writing, students will be asked to make connections between literature and the world, and to compose a term paper that interprets some aspect of our contemporary world through the lens(es) of the course texts.

Because this is a W, there will be regular writing work, including response groups and conferences, and the drafting and revising of six 750-word papers (around 4500 words or 15 pages). I expect regular attendance and participation. There will be some brief lectures, but expect mostly discussion and small group work.

Required texts (a preliminary list): Toni Morrison, Beloved; Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian; Octavia Butler, The Parable of the Sower; Ann Patchett, The Patron Saint of Liars; Marilynne Robinson, Gilead; Leigh Bardugo, Ninth House.

2214W: African American Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2301W-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Duane, Anna Mae 

 

2274W: Disability in American Literature and Culture

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2274W-01 | TuTh 5:00-6:15 | Duane, Anna Mae (HB)

 

2276: American Utopias and Dystopias

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2276-01 | MWF 9:05-9:55 | Eby, Claire

This course focuses mostly on recent dystopian novels but also includes short selections from The Utopia Reader (second edition, edited by Claeys and Sargeant) to provide some understanding of the long history of the utopian tradition. Then we dig into stories, often terrifying, about a young Native American woman’s pregnancy during a time of escalating efforts to control reproduction (Louise Erdrich’s Future Home of the Living God); the experience of a sole human survivor tormented by memories while surrounded by posthumans (Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake); a zombie novel set in an America where capitalism has run amuck (Colson Whitehead’s Zone One); a cautionary tale about landing the perfect Silicon Valley job (Dave Eggers’s The Circle); and an “ambiguous utopia” contrasting capitalist and anarchist societies (Ursula K. LeGuin’s The Dispossessed). The reading runs around 200 pages per week, and additional requirements are based on its timely completion: four one-page position papers (20% of final grade), midterm (20%), final (20%), regular quizzes at the start of class (20%), and discussion (20%).

2301W: Anglophone Literatures

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2301W-01 | MWF 10:10-11:15 | Kuiti, Samadrita

This course is meant to serve as a broad overview of postcolonial and global anglophone literatures from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. The goal of this course is to provide you with an understanding of the social, historical, and political forces which shaped the literatures emerging from former British colonies, during and after the period of colonialism. In particular, you will see the ways in which history, literature, and politics are all inextricably linked to each other and often form the basis of a postcolonial identity aside from understanding how the English language itself has been remodeled by the English speakers of the Anglophone world. Additionally, you will learn to read each literary work or “artifact” through a “lens” or a theoretical framework that will help you develop critical perspectives toward each one of the individual literary works that we will be reading. Specifically, we will use the “lens” of postcolonial, historical, feminist, and anti-racist critiques.

2301W-02 | MWF 12:10-1:10 | Kuiti, Samadrita 

See description above.

2401: Poetry

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2401-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Cohen, Bruce 

This course will focus on the close reading and analysis of verse to expand your appreciation of the traditions of poetry. We will explore poetic techniques, forms and strategies and learn to critically analyze poetry. We will delve into what makes a poem a “poem.” We will discuss some of the various “schools” of poetry and I will provide you with some historical context for the sensibilities and conventions of poetry and the poems themselves. The goal of the course is to expand your interest in poetry to the point that you will read it outside of class, well after the course has concluded and be able to discuss poetry in an intelligent manner. Course requirements include ACTIVE class participation, written essays and a final exam. You will read poems from the Norton Anthology as well as many poems you will be able to find online. In addition, I will periodically post essays on Poetry that we will discuss.

2401-02 | 12:30-1:45 | Mahoney, Charles

True ease in writing comes from art, not chance,

As those move easiest who have learned to dance.

(Alexander Pope, “An Essay on Criticism”)

As for writing, so for reading: a course in learning how to let your feet go bare in verse. We will concentrate on poetic artifice and technique, meter and form, sound and sense (ever attentive to Wallace Stevens’s dictum that “There is a sense in sounds beyond their meaning”), across a selective survey of poetry in English from the sixteenth century to the 2020s. We will emphasize the close reading of a variety of forms and genres (e.g., sonnets, ballads, elegies, odes, blank verse, nonsense verse, nursery rhymes), attending throughout to questions of a poem’s “literariness”: how its language works, how it is made, how it is composed for its particular rhetorical end, and how it interacts with its own literary history. Likely requirements: attendance and participation, midterm video reading, close reading assignments, final examination.

2401-03 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Cohen, Bruce 

See description above.

 

2405: Drama

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2405-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Dennigan, Darcie 

Theatre may be, in the words of playwright Sibyl Kempson, that rift between what we see and what we acknowledge, "what is part of the laws of reality that we are taught, and this other aspect of reality that those laws can’t be applied to." This space written and unwritten laws, between *what we see* and *what we acknowledge,* a space that drama opens up and invites us into, is the crux of this class... The first third of the semester we'll use Sophocles' Antigone as the door to explore how writers like Fugard, Brecht, Miyagawa, and others have used theatre as public protest. The rest of the semester we'll read experimental works by Eugene Ionesco, Young-Jean Lee, Toshiki Okada, and Adrienne Kennedy that protest and critique in stranger, less direct, but no less uncompromising ways. Expect to participate regularly in class experiments, discussions, and scene studies; complete weekly short response papers; and dive into one longer essay. 

2407: The Short Story

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2407-01 | MWF 10:10 - 11:00 | Codr, Dwight

This course is designed to introduce students to the short story as a literary form. The course, which includes short stories from a range of periods and authors, invites students to engage with these stories through formal writing assignments and discussion board posts. Students will also read theoretical texts and pieces of literary criticism, which they will apply to the assigned stories.

2407-02 | MWF 11:15 - 12:05 | Rumbo, Rebecca

In this course, students will read short stories by a variety of writers, ranging from early nineteenth-century fiction to more recent stories. We will learn to understand and analyze the genre, considering plot, theme, character, and technique; the syllabus will be organized topically. We will read, on average, three stories a week, although we’ll spend more time on longer and more complex stories (e.g., Pushkin’s “The Queen of Spades” and Joyce’s “The Dead”). Assignments will include brief writing assignments, participation in class discussion, a research project, and midterm and final exams (this applies to an in-person class; if we are online again in the fall, we will not have exams). 

We will read selections from the following texts: The Art of the Short Story, eds. Gioia and Gwynn (Pearson/Longman: 2006) and The Oxford Book of Latin American Short Stories, ed. González Echevarría (Oxford: 1997). (DL)

2407-03 | MWF 12:20-1:10 | Cordon, Joanne

Our Stories, Our Selves; Or: Passion! Adventure! Heartache! Mystery!

In The White Album, Joan Didion argues that narrative helps us make sense of the world we live in: “We tell ourselves stories in order to live.” Following her insight, we will read a spectrum of classic to contemporary short stories, sampling the fictional worlds created by a diverse group of writers. We will also consider how various artists deploy the elements of the genre: Plot, character, setting, point of view, and style. All of the stories come from The Story and Its Writer. Assignments will include two brief response papers, midterm, and one essay.

2407-04 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Burke, Mary

This course will concentrate on short stories by American and international authors. Students will sample a broad spectrum of short stories illustrating a particular style, era, national tradition, or theme and will learn how to read with careful critical attention. Coursework will consist of a practice essay, a midterm long-format paper, response papers, group discussion, and a final assessment. 

2409: The Modern Novel

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2409-01 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Winter, Sarah 

This course will examine modernist experimentation in narrative technique and the representation of psychology, sexuality, and consciousness, as well as the changing historical, cultural, and aesthetic frameworks of novels by Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster, Zora Neale Hurston, and R. K. Narayan. The course will also serve as an introduction to narrative theory. Requirements: midterm exam; final exam; a short critical analysis paper and presentation; 6-7 page final paper.

2411: Popular Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2411-02 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Knapp, Kathy (HB)

The coming-of-age story, scholars such as Mikael Bakhtin tells us, emerged out of the revolutions that rocked Europe in the eighteenth century; the story of a young person facing a series of obstacles as he (because he was originally always a “he”) navigates his way through the world was meant to help safely usher readers as well through the turbulence of history and into modernity. As a genre, the coming-of-age story (or bildungsroman, as we will discuss) has not only endured, but has continued to do important cultural work. This class focuses closely on several recent coming-of-age novels in order to think more broadly about the role that the U.S. novel of development has historically played in the construction of an ideal citizenry. We will begin by reading critical discussions about the significance of the bildungsroman in Western literature in order to craft our own provisional understanding of the formal and thematic concerns that make it especially well-suited to tell the story of a diverse but unified American body politic. With a set of premises offering a foundation for reading, we will turn to contemporary coming-of-age stories (among them Jesmyn Ward's Salvage the Bones, Ruth Ozeki's A Tale For the Time Being, and Chang-Rae Lee's On Such a Full Sea) that take into consideration some of the challenges of the 21st Century (thus far): the events of 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, racial and economic injustice, climate change, and yes, the pandemic. How do these recent stories imagine or perhaps reimagine and reshape readers’ understanding of being and belonging in challenging times? The aim of this course is not only to develop and hone your critical reading, writing and thinking skills in relation to the novels on the syllabus, but to provide you with a framework and tools for being thoughtful lifelong readers, writers, thinkers, and citizens.

2411-03 | 12:00AM-12:00AM | Cormier, Emily (WW)
2411-04 | 12:00AM-12:00AM | Cormier, Emily (WW)

2411W: Popular Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2411W-02 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Grossman, Leigh 

Worldbuilding and Secondary Worlds in Fantasy from Tolkien to Today

Ursula Le Guin said that JRR Tolkien “removed the apology from fantasy,” meaning that after Tolkien, writers could set their stories in a world distinct from our own without explaining that it was all a dream, or set in a distant past, or some other apology. But world-building has evolved a lot since Tolkien’s day, and many of the underlying theoretical assumptions that seemed so startling in the mid-1960s when the “pirated” edition of Lord of the Rings hit the U.S. market are tied to uncomfortable assumptions about race, gender, and sexuality. The course looks at how the way fantasy writers build secondary worlds has evolved from Tolkien’s day to today’s fantasies, both through primary works and critical essays. Readings will start with classic works by Tolkien and Le Guin, but will mostly focus on current writers such as Guy Gavriel Kay, Michael Swanwick, Sarah Beth Durst, Nnedi Okorafor, and Rebecca Roanhorse.

2411W-01 | TuTh 5:00-6:15 | Grossman, Leigh 

See description above

2413: The Graphic Novel

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011 Not open to students who have passed ENGL 3621 when taught as "The Graphic Novel"

2413-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Cutter, Martha 

Historical Graphic Novel: This class takes seriously the emergence of comics as a legitimate site of interdisciplinary inquiry and scholarly engagement and as a source of both evoking and revising history. Over the course of the semester, we will consider the ways in which graphic narrative presents a particularly unique approach to U.S. history that questions dominant accounts of racial progress and mainstream characterizations of American exceptionalism. From Jim Crow segregation to the Holocaust, from the forced relocation of Native peoples to the Japanese American incarceration/internment, and from de jure discrimination to systemic state violence, graphic narratives have become a literary genre in which to contemplate the contradictions of U.S. personhood, selfhood, and nationhood. Books will include some of these: Art Spiegelman: Maus I &2 (1986-1992); Kyle Baker: Nat Turner (2008); John Lewis, March Books 1-3 (2013-2016); Mat Johnson and Warren Pleece, Incognegro (2008), Gene Luen Yang, The Shadow Hero (2014); GB Tran: Vietnamerica (2011); Howard Cruse, Stuck Rubber Baby (1995); Allison Bechdel, Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic (2006); Robin Ha, Almost American Girl: An Illustrated Memoir (2020); Lynda Barry, One! Hundred! Demons! (2002); Kim Krans, Blossoms and Bones: Drawing a Life Back Together (2020); Scott McCloud, Understanding Comics (1993. Requirements: class participation; husky CT postings; short paper; long paper/project or take home final exam. Please note: This is a student-learning centered class, so effective engagement in class discussion is a mandatory part of this course.

2600: Introduction to Literary Studies

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011 or 3800; open to English majors, others with instructor consent.

2600-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Coundouriotis, Eleni 

This gateway course into the major introduces you to the range of activities and types of analysis that define literary study. We will cover topics such as what makes a text literary, the formal conventions of different genres, and key concepts of contemporary literary theory. We will also explore different avenues for interdisciplinary and comparative studies. The course does not limit itself to a period or a genre but uses an eclectic set of texts that open up to a wide range of different approaches. We will engage in close textual analysis throughout the course while also paying attention to how literature engages the world.

You will learn research skills, such as searching appropriate databases, distinguishing scholarly sources from other material, how to handle in-text quotations, and MLA style citations. Assignments include two 5-page papers and two exams.

2600-02 | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Somerset, Fiona 

This course is required of English majors: it is designed to teach you research, critical thinking, and writing skills that will help you do well in upper-division courses and beyond. You will be asked to produce three short papers (3 pages) that build on smaller research and writing assignments completed online and/or in class. Our readings will include poems, short items presented in digital media, and critical essays. You will be asked to learn some key terms and methods, and invited to begin using them to join the conversation among critics in the field.

2605: Capitalism, Literature, and Culture

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011 

2605-01 | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Eby, Clare

Honors

We’ll read some of capitalism’s most influential theorists (such as Adam Smith and Karl Marx) and look at some of its most ardent defenders (such as Milton Friedman and Ayn Rand). The primary focus, however, will be on twentieth- and twenty-first century novels and a few films that raise questions about whether capitalism is the best, much less the inevitable, way of structuring the economy—and so many other aspects of life. We will consider if there is a racial component to capitalism and also the possibility of a new form of surveillance capitalism emerging in the digital age. The reading list for this course is still a work in progress, but will likely include such novels as Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Dave Eggers’s The Circle, Colson Whitehead’s Zone One, and Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Dispossessed. In addition to a substantial amount of reading, course requirements include a 15-minute presentation on a full scholarly book, a short paper, a research paper, spot quizzes—and lots of lively discussion.

I expect there will be plenty of room for non-honors students with a strong academic record and writing skills. If you are interested, feel free to inquire about the course (clare.eby@uconn.edu), though I won’t be able to give out permission numbers until after honors students’ scheduled enrollment appointments

2610: Introduction to Digital Humanities

Prerequisites: None

2610-01 | MW 4:40-5:55 | Booten, Kyle (DL)

This class is an introduction to the Digital Humanities, an adventurous multidisciplinary approach that imagines the ways that computational media can change what it means to write, read, and think---one of the most important questions facing a world that is increasingly mediated by interfaces and algorithms.

Some topics we will consider:

* Quantitative techniques for "reading" vast quantities of text that would be impractical to read closely
* Digital archives that intend to transform what it means to study literature, historical archives, art, and other humanistic subjects
* Worried arguments that contemporary digital and especially social media are rewiring our brains and our attention spans (possibly making it more difficult to read novels and other media?)
* "Electronic literature," poems and other texts that make novel and creative use of computational techniques and forms

DH often involves doing things and making things, more so than traditional humanistic pursuits. Weekly hands-on activities will introduce you to key DH tools and techniques.

2627: Topics in Literary Studies

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2627-01 | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Bleiler, Richard

Science Fiction is sometimes dismissed as “escape literature.” In a response, Ursula K. LeGuin argued that only jailors fear people escaping, and that “if we value the freedom of mind and soul, if we’re partisans of liberty, then it’s our plain duty to escape, and to take as many people with us as we can!” This said, science fiction is a transformative literary genre involving the new and its ramifications, and English 2627, Science Fiction: History and Development, examines genre science fiction texts (and the occasional motion picture and graphic novel) written in English between 1888 (Ed-ward Bellamy’s Looking Backward: 2000-1887) and the present. We will discuss such topics as pulp magazines, cyber-punk, steampunk, alternative worlds, aliens, utopian and dystopian literatures, individual rights, space and time travel, outer and inner spaces, robots and androids, the past and the future, and (re)presentations of gender and social sys-tems. These are enormous topics: our discussions cannot be exhaustive, and you are welcome and encouraged to ex-plore them further on your own.

Attendance and participation are essential and absences will hurt your grade. Please make every attempt to arrive on time. If you must miss a class, please let me know.

Students are expected to attend prepared to discuss the reading(s), such discussion informed and supplemented by the background reading(s). These background readings will probably not be discussed in class, but you remain responsible for having read them and knowledge of them should inform discussions and presentations.

At the conclusion of this course, all students will be asked to formulate a definition of science fiction, and provide rele-vant examples from the primary and secondary readings, or explain in detail why they are unable to provide such a defi-nition, also with examples from the primary and secondary readings.

Students are asked to write a brief (no more than one page) opinion paper on each novel and show that they have read the work by answering the questions of “What makes this work science fiction?” and “What did I like (or dislike) about this work?” These papers should be completed before the novel is discussed. All papers must be double-spaced, prefer-ably in Calibri 11 point or Times New Roman 12 point font. Citation format must be MLA.

All students will be asked to give oral reports on author(s) being read and movements being examined. These reports should be brief and must take no more than 5 minutes, but they are intended to present essential information and should be taken seriously.

In addition, students are asked to collaborate on group projects. Both will be on assigned subjects, the highlights of which will be presented as a formal presentation.

2635: Literature and the Environment

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2635-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Begg, Leah 

Ecocritical approaches to literature about the natural world and the nonhuman from the eighteenth century to today. May include such authors as Mary Shelley, Sarah Orne Jewett, Amitav Ghosh, Cormac McCarthy, and Margaret Atwood. 

 

2635-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Menrisky, Alexander

This course provides an introduction to human relationships with environment through the lens of literature. “Environment” in this course will mean both nonhuman nature and environments built by humans, and we will read fiction, nonfiction, poetry, film, and other media (mostly from the United States) to consider how concepts like “nature” and “environment” have meant different things at different times. We will do so specifically by studying how ideas about “nature,” race, and gender have influenced each other in an American context, from the early nineteenth century to the present. Texts might include works by such authors as Henry David Thoreau, Rachel Carson, Simon Ortiz, bell hooks, and Margaret Atwood.

2640: Studies in Film

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. 

2640-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Shringarpure, Bhakti

Feminism and Film

This course is dedicated to examining the ways in which feminist filmmakers have historically transformed the conception, practice and theory of cinema. We will engage with films from around the world and work through foundational concepts of feminist film studies. Literary and theoretical readings about gender, sexuality, intersectionality, queer and trans studies will be included with a focus on themes such as  resistance, revolution, solidarity, transnationalism, race and aesthetics. We will watch, discuss and write about films by Sarah Maldoror, Moufida Tlatli, Chantal Akerman, Trinh T Minh-ha, Mati Diop, Agnes Varda, Deepa Mehta, Claire Denis, Celine Sciamma, Lula Ali Ismail and Shirin Neshat, among others. This class is open to all undergraduates.

2701: Creative Writing I

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Cannot be taken for credit after passing ENGL 3701, 3703, or 3713. Not open to students who have passed ENGL 1701.

2701-01 | MW4:40-5:55 | Pontacoloni, Michael
2701-02 | TuTh 8:00-9:15 | Forbes, Sean

The Speaker: The Eye of the Poem and the Short Story

According to Frances Mayes, “the poet ‘finds’ the right speaker and the right listener, usually by trying out several approaches.” In this introduction to creative writing class, we will examine the different approaches that a writer can take when trying to establish a speaker in a poem or short story. We will look at exemplary works of poetry and fiction from writers like Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Hayden, Marilyn Nelson, and Justin Torres. Students will produce a final portfolio of their original work. Class participation is an essential component to this workshop-based course along with weekly writing prompts such as writing in iambic pentameter and challenging prose sketches.  

2701-03 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Cohen, Bruce 

This introductory class to creative writing will provide instruction to the craft, techniques and esthetics of writing poetry and creative nonfiction. Students will also focus on critical analysis of other students’ work and develop a “community” language/vocabulary for discussing literature; therefore, class participation will be essential. Students will be required to compose polished poems and creative nonfiction essays. Writing exercise and/or prompts will be given each week and students will compose written work each week. Revision and process will be highly stressed. Students will learn to become acquainted with the “workshop” format and be required to read contemporary poetry and non-fiction to better understand and deepen their appreciation of the practice of creative writing. This course is designed for any student who has a serious interest in learning about the rigors of creative writing.

1701-04 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Forbes, Sean 

See description above.

2730W: Travel Writing

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. 

2730W-01 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Litman, Ellen

This course is designed to introduce students to the craft of travel writing, with attention to the history, variety, and ethics of the genre. Students will explore this vibrant genre of non-fiction by reading a range of travel writing, most of it contemporary. They will write three original travel essays grounded in their experiences, as well as one critical analysis of published travel writing. They will also remix one of their essays into another medium, such as a video, audio essay, illustrated narrative, or annotated map. All the essays will be composed in drafts, with peer review. Other requirements include participating in class discussions, posting to discussion boards, completing tests and quizzes, reviewing the drafts of others, and assembling a final portfolio. 

3000-Level Courses

3003W: Topics in Writing Studies

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

3003W-01 | MW 4:40-5:55 | Brueggemann, Brenda

“Writing is always the hero of writing,” wrote former UNH professor, Thomas Newkirk (in The Performance of Self in Student Writing, 1997). When we write, we often make, mark (and mask) our identity. And too, our identities can be shaped by our writing choices, styles, practices. We’ll be exploring that toggle between writing and identity in this course.

Our readings will run a wide range of eras and genres. Here are some examples:

· very old philosophical dialogues (Plato and his problems with writing)

· French (feminist) philosopher Helene Cixous answering Plato back from “The Laugh of the Medusa”);

· podcasts about writing (from several angles and genres);

· blogs (like Stephen Kuusisto’s “Planet of The Blind”);

· fiction & Broadway play (Mark Haddon’s Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time);

· graphic narrative (Cece Bell’s El Deafo);

· literary essays (a few of Montaigne’s classics; Michelle Cliff, “If I Could Write This in Fire…”; Gloria Anzuldua, “The Path of Red & Black Ink”; and Barry Lopez, “Landscape and Narrative”);

· probably Amanda Gorman’s 2021 inaugural poem, “The Hill We Climb”

Our writing for the course (for this *is* a writing course!) will engage both multimodal and traditional forms, all caught up with “truth-telling”: personal narrative, creative non-fiction, memoir, blogposts, etc. You will likely learn a few new technologies to compose with (Stopmotion Animation, Infographics, Adobe Spark, etc). Each week will invite a brief prompt response (writing both in and outside of class writing). All written work in the course connects and builds to three major projects and a final portfolio cover letter.

 

3082: Writing Center Practicum

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

3010W-01 | Arr | Tonry, Kathleen 

 

3091: Writing Internship

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

3091-01 | Arr. | Fairbanks, Ruth 

Writing Internships provide unique opportunities for students to write in non-academic settings in which they are supervised by professional writers. Internships are recognized as an important aspect of undergraduate education and many employers prefer applicants with internship experience. English majors have priority of choice for English 3091, but the course is open to students in other disciplines. Both on-campus and off-campus placements offering a wide variety of professional experiences are available. This is a variable-credit course, and students may elect from one to six credits of training. Grading is on the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory scale. The course may be repeated for credit with no more than eight credits per placement.

Placements have included Cashman & Katz Advertising, Connecticut Landmarks, Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, Globe Pequot Press, Legal Assistance Resource Center of Connecticut, The Dodd Research Center and Archive, Mystic Seaport, New Britain Museum of American Art, UConn Alumni Foundation, UConn School of Pharmacy, UConn Women’s Center, and Von der Mehden Development Office. Many other placements are available.

3117W: Romantic British Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

3117W-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Igarashi, Yohei (HB)

This course is an introduction to British Romantic literature. Though Romanticism was a relatively brief movement (from the later eighteenth century through the early nineteenth century), it was also a momentous one: pivotal in literary history especially for poetry, theories about literature, and the essay form, and of enduring interest for its artistic responses to the beginnings of modernity and political upheaval.

Readings are from the great authors of the period—including Jane Austen, William Blake, Lord Byron, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Thomas de Quincey, William Hazlitt, John Keats, Charles Lamb, Mary and Percy Shelley, Charlotte Smith, and William Wordsworth–as well as contemporaneous philosophical, political, and scientific writing.

Course requirements: attendance, written assignments, and midterm and final exams.

3120: Irish Literature in English to 1939

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

3120-01 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Bertekap, Sarah 

This course will focus on the ways that earlier myths, literary forms, characters, and themes in Irish literature are taken up and adapted during both the Irish Literary Revival at the turn of the twentieth century and throughout the formation of the Irish nation. We will examine how Irish writers selected elements of their country’s past literary traditions and then revised, rewrote, or re-presented those elements as a part of a literary, nation-making political project, which unfolded as Ireland itself fought for and achieved independence from the British Empire. We will pay close attention to the ways in which older themes or characters which did not align with Ireland’s twentieth-century, nationalist vision of itself may have been excluded or written out of the mainstream literary tradition. We’ll move between novels, drama, poetry, and prose and practice the methods required for writing literary analysis of these forms. No experience with the Irish language is necessary, but we will consider Irish-language texts in translation. Work for the course will include three major projects and an in-class presentation.

3212: Asian American Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

3212-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Kim, Na-Rae

By exploring various artistic productions by Asian Americans, this course seeks to grasp central issues and themes for understanding contemporary Asian America, and furthermore, multicultural America. Asian American literary productions exhibit vibrant re-imagination of American history, nation-state, nationalism, citizenship, identity, and difference.

This course is not a survey of these works, as Asian Americans are a diverse group of people whose literature reflect multiple backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives. Instead, our readings and assignments focus on key themes including: racism, stereotypes, gender expectations, migration, representation, and redefining America. Through this course, we consider how even the seemingly most personal relationships expressed in cultural production are rooted in and shaped by historical and social circumstances.

3215: Twentieth and Twenty-First Century African American Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

3215-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Cutter, Martha 

This course will be an investigation of African American literature written in the twentieth and twenty-first century, with a particular focus on fiction, poetry, and contemporary African American novels. We will begin by considering the origins of African American novels in fiction written during the Harlem Renaissance, and work our way forward to contemporary works. Throughout the semester we will be asking some serious questions about the ways in which an “expected” set of criteria comes to constitute African American literature, and why books that fall outside these criteria are less popular. Readings will likely include Nella Larsen, Passing (1929); Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987); Jesmyn Ward, Salvage the Bones (2011) or Sing, Unburied, Sing (2017); Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me (2015); Colson Whitehead, Zone One (2016); Maurice Carlos Ruffin, We Cast a Shadow (2019); Britt Bennett, The Vanishing Half (2020); and short fiction and poems by Zora Neale Hurston; Richard Wright; James Baldwin; Langston Hughes; Gwendolyn Brooks; Ralph Ellison; Alice Walker; June Jordan; Elizabeth Alexander; and Claudia Rankine. Requirements will include class participation; discussion facilitation; short papers and writing assignments; and a take home final exam or a final paper. Please note: This is a student-learning centered class, so effective engagement in class discussion is a mandatory part of this course.

3240E: American Nature Writing

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

3240E-01 | 12:00AM-12:00AM | King'oo, Clare (WW)

 

3320: Literature and Culture of India

Prerequisites: Not open to students who have passed ENGL 3318 with a topic of "India."

3320-01 | TuTh 2:00-3:15 | Mathews, Rebecca (DL)

The objective of this course is to offer a passage to India through a selection of representative literary works and films. It provides an overview of ancient as well as contemporary aspirations of a country that is traditionally recognized as the birthplace of numerous religions, philosophy, and great works of literature. In addition, it is now also emerging as a major player in the global economy. The goal of this course is to examine and understand the seeming paradoxes of a country that celebrates diversity even as it successfully synthesizes varied linguistic, religious, cultural and political forces. 

The class will be reading works by Arundhati Roy. R K Narayan, Amitav Ghosh, Rabindranath Tagore and the condensed version of Ramayana by R K Narayan. 

As this course involves discussions, quizzes, presentations and written responses, participation in classroom activities is mandatory. Students are expected to read the assigned literature for each class and be prepared for the activities in class. Course requirements include active participation in discussions and presentations, a mid-term exam, in-class writing and a final essay. 

3420: Children’s Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

3420-01 | TuTh 8:00-9:15 | Capshaw, Katherine

This course examines the features of the modern canon of children’s literature, analyzing children’s books both as works of art and as powerful cultural influences. The class begins by studying landmark fairy tales like Cinderella, Puss-in-Boots, and Sleeping Beauty, noting their roots in oral culture as well as their significance to contemporary child readers, and then turns to the “golden age” of children’s literature by examining Alice in Wonderland. We will explore the Harlem Renaissance by focusing on Langston Hughes's work for children and then shift into contemporary texts. The majority of the course analyzes the work of Black writers and writers of color. Please note that this course does not focus on pedagogy.   

3422: Young Adult Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011 or 3800; open to juniors or higher.

3422-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Forbes, Sean

We will read YA books seriously and have fun, challenging, and heady conversation about them. The syllabus is arranged to discuss how the field of Young Adult Literature has changed over time, offering a historical picture of what the genre has been and paying attention to what’s been happening more recently. How did these early YA books shape how we think of YA as a genre, and how has the literature changed over the decades? We will come to a better understanding of the history, purpose, and unique challenges of Young Adult Literature. Most importantly, we will examine the negotiation of power in these texts. In addition, we will consider published critical responses to the works we read, and, learning from these articles, craft papers that demonstrate an ability to engage with the scholarly community. 

3501: Chaucer

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011 or 3800; open to juniors or higher.

3501-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Biggs, Frederick 

This course investigates how Chaucer transforms an already stunning literary career and, in should be mentioned, English literature as a whole through his dramatic experiments in the Canterbury Tales.

Readings will include this work in its entirety as well as a selection of sources and analogues for individual tales. Each student will write two papers and take midterm and final exams.

3503: Shakespeare I

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Cannot be taken for credit after passing ENGL 3505.

3503-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Wold, Julia 

We will explore Shakespeare’s principal tragedies and romantic comedies through text, performance, and adaptation. We will read approximately 7-8 plays and watch stage and film adaptations of several of the plays. In this class we will explore how what we read on the page translates to the stage and the screen and analyze how directors and actors choose to represent or interpret Shakespeare’s words. Furthermore, we will interrogate what can we learn about the text from these interpretations.

Requirements include: in-class reading/viewing responses; two short papers (one textual analysis and one film analysis); a midterm essay exam, and a final project which can take various forms including a presentation, lesson plan, final paper, etc.

Plays to be read include: Hamlet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, King Lear, Much Ado About Nothing, Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night, Othello, and The Winter’s Tale

3509: Studies in Individual Writers

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

3509-01 | W 5:00-7:30 | Pelizzon, Penelope

Emily Dickinson and Gwendolyn Brooks

An exploration of two brilliant American poets who convey intense experience through groundbreaking linguistic experimentation. Gwendolyn Brooks (1917-2000), one of the most influential and beloved poets of her time, was the first Black author to win the Pulitzer Prize. Celebrated in her lifetime for her formal innovations as well as her political consciousness, her work has been a touchstone for writers through the present day. In contrast, Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) saw few works in print while she was alive. Yet the first volume of her poems, published four years after her death, met with astonishing success. Since then, she has been recognized as one of the most breathtakingly original poets to write in English. We’ll be reading poems and letters by these authors, as well as selected secondary criticism on their works. Group discussion lies at the heart of the course, with much of our conversation shaped by discussion board posts you’ll share before each class. Writing: Weekly discussion analyses of the readings, a midterm project, and a final exam.

3601: The English Language

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

3601-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Biggs, Frederick 

The goal of this course is to improve the students’ writing and, as a collateral benefit, their ability to teach this subject to others by explaining key elements of the grammatical structure of English. The text, Rodney Huddleston and Geoffrey K. Pullum’s A Student’s Introduction to English Grammar (Cambridge: CUP, 2005) provides a detailed account of many of the rules that control the language. It is an essential starting-point for linguists. Our focus, however, is slightly different: the rules that underlie related syntactic structures which allow for revision.

Take this somewhat grim example: loss of blood threatened his life. This sentence can be derived from two independent clauses: he lost blood and his life was threatened. But how exactly are they related? Sign up and find out: it may save if not your life your GPA.

This course will consist of lectures, exercises, blog posts, and tests. Students will also submit a five-slide powerpoint on a topic related to the English language.

3605: Latina/o Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011 or 3800 or instructor consent; open to juniors or higher.

3605-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Sanchez, Lisa

This course is an introduction to literatures of communities considered “Latino” in the U.S. This nomenclature is highly contested and often misunderstood. For literary historians, Latinas and Latinos refer to American citizens living in regions annexed by the U.S., through warfare, in the nineteenth century (primarily the Northern Mexican territories in 1848 and Puerto Rico in 1898) and their descendants, wherever they live in the U.S. The term also includes migrants to the U.S. from Latin America during the twentieth century, whether they are U.S. citizens, residents, guest workers, or denizens. Latinos are a heterogeneous group; some are of European descent, some are of African descent, some are of Native American descent, some are of Asian descent, and some are of a mix of these and other regional, national, ethnic, or religious identities. What unites Latinos as a group is that the U.S. government, the U.S. mainstream media, and U.S. popular culture tend to mark them as a distinct ethnic group. Latino studies critically addresses the character and history of that marking.

Our main focus this semester is to explore classic texts in the Puerto Rican diaspora’s literary tradition, including the study of figures like Pura Belpré, Arturo Schomburg, Luisa Capetillo, Jesús Colón, and William Carlos Williams. Our task is not to evaluate how “authentically” these texts may or may not represent Latino culture, but to explore them as art; that is, as literary and historical texts motivated by the aesthetic and ethical inspiration of those who write them and those who read them.

This course is a study of a subaltern American literary tradition. Students will learn how and why the aesthetic, cultural, historical, geographical, and ethical complexities of this body of writing matter to contemporary readers.

Note: Students who would like to enroll in this upper division course before their junior year should e-mail the professor to request a permission number: Lisa.M.Sanchez@uconn.edu. Please provide your reasons for wanting to take the course.

3609: Women’s Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

3609-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Shringarpure, Bhakti 

This course offers a broad survey of contemporary writing by women, feminists and queer writers across several regions, genres and themes. We will examine the ways in which women's literature has historically worked to claim and rewrite categories of gender and sexuality. We will also attend to the ways in which writers of color and international writers have subverted ideologies of an imperial Western feminism. Readings include fiction, poetry and theory with works by Toni Morrison, Buchi Emecheta, Leila Aboulela, Audre Lorde, Joy Harjo, Akwaeke Emezi, Hanan Al Shaykh, Ismat Chugtai, Saidiya Hartman and Tsitsi Dangarembga among several others. This class is open to juniors and higher. 

3613: Introduction to LGBT Literature

Prerequisites: None.

3613-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Bertekap, Sarah 

This course will provide an introduction to some of the key questions in the study of twentieth- and twenty-first century LGBT literature: How do literary forms represent gender identity and sexualities considered unspeakable or unrepresentable in mainstream society? Which lives and identities are considered central to the LGBT literary canon, and which are sidelined? How do LGBT texts resist, subvert, or complicate the linear forces of narrative, history, and temporality? Our course will explore the ways in which narratives of LGBT lives are told through poetry, prose, drama, graphic novels, and film. We will examine texts that have come to define the LGBT canon as well as contemporary texts working to challenge or revise the logics of that literary tradition. Students will have the opportunity to trace the afterlives of some of these texts through their consequent adaptations, and we will sample secondary literature from key feminist and queer scholars to better situate these texts in the larger fields of queer and feminist theories. Work for the course will include three major projects and an in-class presentation.

3621: Studies in Literature and Culture

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

3621-01 | Tu 3:30-6:30 | Sibelman, Grae

3629: Introduction to Holocaust Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011 or 3800; open to sophomores or higher. May not be taken for credit after passing ENGL 3623 or 3619 offered as Holocaust literature.

3629-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Breen, Margaret

While paying attention to both historical context and legacy, this course focuses primarily on memoirs and other related literary texts authored by Holocaust writers such as Paul Celan, Charlotte Delbo, Ida Fink, Primo Levi, Don Pagis, Nelly Sachs, Nechama Tec, and Eli Wiesel.

Requirements: regular class discussion; a midterm, a 5-7-page paper, and an 8-10-page research paper.

3631: Literature, Culture, and Humanitarianism

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to sophomores or higher. 

3631-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Coundouriotis, Eleni 

War is the subject of humanitarianism par excellence. Humanitarian law, for example, is the “law of wars” that seeks to minimize the suffering of individuals in warfare. Humanitarian “intervention” frequently means military intervention. Furthermore, the work of international humanitarian organizations to alleviate suffering caused by armed conflict forms a large part of our understanding of humanitarian emergency.  In this course, we will examine how the war novel in its classic and contemporary forms engages with the ideals of humanitarianism.  We will look at the varying aesthetic strategies (realism, naturalism, personal narrative, etc) that authors have deployed to capture the experience of war. We will also ask how (and if) a definition of humanitarianism arises from their work. Our discussions will take place in the context of a broader discussion of how humanitarianism is defined in the human rights field.  

Assignments include an oral presentation, a take-home essay for the midterm exam, and a final project.   

3701: Creative Writing II

Prerequisites: ENGL 1701; instructor consent required. May be repeated once for credit.

3701-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Choffel, Julie

Poetry and Creative Non-Fiction

In this workshop class, we will focus on writing original works of creative nonfiction and poetry. Students will share their own creative pieces with the class and respond to one another’s writing through workshop discussion as well as written responses. We will read from contemporary poets and writers who challenge our notions of what a poem or essay can do, and experiment with multiple ways of writing and revising our work. Students will be expected to work towards a portfolio of writing across the semester, to respond to assigned single-author texts of poetry and creative nonfiction, and to meet with the instructor occasionally to discuss their work. Instructor permission required; interested students should email julie.choffel@uconn.edu with a brief description of their experience with creative writing (including related classes they’ve already taken) and a short writing sample of their own poetry and prose. 

3703: Writing Workshop

Prerequisites: ENGL 1701; instructor consent required. May be repeated once for credit.

3703-01 | TuTh 11:00-12:15 | Litman, Ellen

Fiction

This seminar is designed for upper-level undergraduate students interested in writing fiction, and as such it will require a great deal of writing, reading, and revising. Students will write 3 original short stories (or novel chapters) and complete a series of exercises. Most pieces will be then revised for the final portfolio (the final project for this class). The students will be required to actively participate in the discussions (in-class and on HuskyCT) of the assigned readings and their peers’ work. The course texts will likely consist of craft essays, individual short stories or novel excerpts, and a couple of short story collections and/or novels. For a permission number, please e-mail 4-6 pages of your fiction as a .doc or .pdf attachment to Professor Litman at ellen.litman@uconn.edu.  

 

3711: Creative Writing for Child and Young Adult Readers

Prerequisites: ENGL 1701; open to sophomores or higher; instructor consent required. Recommended preparation: one 3000-level creative writing workshop. May be repeated once for credit.

3711-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Dennigan, Darcie (DL)

In 1977, at a conference on children's literature at UC Berkeley, June Jordan gave a lecture in which she declared, "Love is lifeforce... Love is opposed to the death of the dream. Love is opposed to the delimiting of possibilities of experience." Here we are now in 2021, struggling to sustain the human species and more than ever we need books that write new worlds & possibilities into existence. Let's do it. This class will be a studio space-- to write together sometimes-- and a workshop space: not to "fix" your work but to expand, challenge, and confirm it. We will read several children's books to spur discussions and imaginations. We'll read several essays that will ground our writing. This class refuses the idea that great children's literature follows a template. Expect to write multiple drafts of three picture books, one nonfiction chapter book, and the first two chapters of a middle grade or YA novel. Also expect to respond with generosity and rigor to the work of your fellow students. Please send work sample and letter of interest to darcie.dennigan@uconn.edu

3715E: Nature Writing Workshop

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to sophomores or higher; instructor consent required. Recommended preparation: ENGL 1701.

3715E-01 | Tu 5:00-7:30 | Pelizzon, Penelope

This class is an imaginative exploration of ecologies and environments through poetry, nonfiction, and fiction. You’ll be reading widely and sharing your own creative writing each week. Our readings will prompt many questions: how can our practice as writers make us more conscious co-habitants of our ecosystems? How can imaginative writing deepen our understanding of local places and of those who lived here before us? How might poems and stories engage crucial environmental issues? Participants will write and revise six projects, exploring different genres and techniques. Participants will also keep a field log using a local ecosystem of their choice as the center for daily reflective/ observational/ historical/ speculative writerly “ramblings.” Most weeks, we’ll divide the class meeting time between participant-led discussion of the readings, constructive critique of workshop members’ own poems and prose, and short in-class writings designed to strengthen aspects of our creative writing craft. Participants should plan to read avidly, to write and revise adventurously, and to engage actively in class discussions.

4000-Level Courses

4600W: Advanced Study: Seminars in Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; at least 12 credits of 2000-level or above English courses or consent of instructor; open to juniors or higher.

4600W-01 | TuTh 12:30-1:45 | Semenza, Gregory 

Oxford Dictionaries’ naming of “Post-Truth” as the 2016 Word of the Year was the main inspiration for the original version of this advanced studies course. From our vantage point in 2021—following a violent insurrection against the US Capitol that was incited by a sitting president’s conspiracy theories regarding the 2020 election—the idea of our living in a post-truth age seems understated and even a little quaint.

Patricia Aufderheide remarks eloquently that “documentaries are about real life; they are not real life.” Following logically, we might ask whether documentaries have more to do with truth, per se, or the ways we construct and consume stories about the truth. Furthermore, to what degree has the indecipherability of differences between fiction and non-fiction stories in our current media landscape—our inability to know how close we actually are to the truth—exacerbated ideological divisions that cause us to interpret the same realities in dramatically different ways?

In this class, we will use the art form of documentary film to explore these and other questions about truth and reality in art, media, politics, and forms of representation (such as our writings) more generally. Studying a mix of about 15 classic and recent documentaries, often in comparison with non-filmic meditations on truth, we’ll celebrate the complexities of these beautiful films and delve deeply into the philosophical and aesthetic questions they inspire.

Assignments/expectations will include passionate participation in class discussions; multiple short reaction papers to films and readings; and a final research project involving your proposal for a documentary production.

4613W: Advanced Study: LGBT Literature

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; at least 12 credits of 2000-level or above English courses or consent of instructor; open to juniors or higher.

4613W-01 | TuTh 3:30-4:45 | Breen, Margaret 

This course will begin by considering texts by early 20th-century authors such as Radclyffe Hall and E. M. Forster, and then move on to a discussion of late-20th- and 21st-century examples of LGBTQIA+ literature written across a variety range of cultures and genres (eg, poetry, drama, and short and long fiction). We will pay special attention to the texts’ responses to questions of literary tradition and their engagement with social and political issues and movements.

Requirements include regular class discussion; a 5-page essay; a 10-12-page research paper or creative project based on research; and a presentation.

4965W: Advanced Studies in Early Literature in English

Prerequisites: ENGL 1007 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011; at least 12 credits of 2000-level or above English courses or consent of instructor; open to juniors or higher.

4965W-01 | TuTh 9:30-10:45 | Mahoney, Charles

Romantic Shakespeare

Romantic actors, directors, and critics redefined the way we think about Shakespeare. In terms of revisions, productions, and criticisms of Shakespeare’s plays, this epoch made Shakespeare modern. And the criticism of Shakespeare from this period remains unsurpassed. This seminar will examine six of Shakespeare’s plays important for Romantic readers, critics, performers, and theatre-goers (Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, Coriolanus, The Tempest), paying attention both to the Folio text and those revisions and prompt-texts used on the Romantic stage. Additionally, we will attend to the accounts and roles of certain key actors and actresses on the stage (e.g., John Philip Kemble, Sarah Siddons, Edmund Kean, Eliza O’Neill) and the writings of a number of important Romantic critics (e.g., Samuel Taylor Coleridge, August Wilhelm Schlegel, William Hazlitt, Elizabeth Inchbald, Thomas de Quincey, Charles Lamb). Our goal will be to understand how the Romantics read Shakespeare and made him modern.

Likely requirements include consistent attendance and participation, two 5-7 page essays, and one 10-12 page research paper.