Summer Course Offerings

Summer 2020

Registration for Summer 2020 will begin on March 23. More information about Summer at UConn can be found here

Class listings for First-Year Writing courses, which include ENGL 1004, 1010, and 1011, are available here.


May Term: May 11 – May 29


ENGL 2407: The Short Story | Online Course | Litman, Ellen

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

This course is an introduction to the short story genre. Students will read a wide variety of short stories, both classical and contemporary, ranging in style from realism to postmodernism to magic realism, and representing the best of the genre from around the world. The course is divided into six units. In the first two, we will cover the basics of the short-story craft. In the next two, we will go back in history and see how the short story genre evolved over time. Finally, in the last two units, we will survey the themes and styles of the contemporary short story. Coursework will involve active online discussions and journal posts, quizzes, two assignments, and an online presentation.


Summer Session 1: June 1 - July 2


ENGL 2274W: Disability in American Literature and Culture | Online Course  | Duane, Anna Mae

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

 

ENGL 2407: The Short Story | Online Course | Carillo, Ellen

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

This course is designed to introduce students to the short story as a literary form. The course, which includes short stories from a range of periods and authors, invites students to engage with these stories through formal writing assignments and discussion board posts. Students will also read theoretical texts and pieces of literary criticism, which they will apply to the assigned stories.  

 

ENGL 3601: The English Language | Online Course | Biggs, Fred and King'oo Clare

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

ENGL 3601 is an intensive five-week course designed for students majoring or minoring in English, as well as for prospective teachers of English at the middle and high-school levels.* Through the lens of recent descriptive (rather than prescriptive) theory, it provides an introduction to the basic structures of the English language. Students will learn how to identify and describe grammatical patterns in English, thereby honing their writing and editing skills. They will also have the opportunity to explore some of the social dimensions of the teaching and learning of English grammar.

Graded and ungraded work will likely include practical grammar exercises, journal entries, discussion posts, presentation slides, and timed exams. Successful completion of the course will require a student time commitment of up to twenty-five hours per week. UConn has partnered with ProctorU for online exam monitoring and authentication of student identity.

Textbook: Rodney Huddleston and Geoffrey Pullum, A Student’s Introduction to English Grammar (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005).

*ENGL 3601 is not intended to provide instruction in the English language for speakers of other languages.


Alternative Session 1: June 1 - July 10


ENGL 1012W: Business Writing I | Online Course | Bird, Trudi

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

 

ENGL 2276: American Utopias and Dystopias | Online Course | Bedore, Pam

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

The very notion of “America” is, arguably, bound up in utopian impulses. This course explores the importance of utopia in understanding America by asking several questions: What is utopia? What do we gain by understanding utopia as an impulse, a philosophical orientation, a literary or popular genre? What is the relationship of utopia to dystopia? To what degree do utopian and dystopian literature shape our thinking about the past, present, and future?

We’ll read six novels:

  • One utopia: Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward
  • One dystopia: Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451
  • Three novels that are hard to categorize: Octavia Butler’s Dawn, M.T. Anderson’s Feed, and Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One
  • One post-apocalyptic novel: Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven.

We’ll look at several kinds of scholarship on these novels, including peer-reviewed articles, book and movie reviews, and a podcast.

This is an online class, so it will include video lectures, open-book online reading quizzes that will point you to the key passages in each novel, and online discussion boards. It’s a W course, so it will require three five page papers and an open-book final exam. There will be short podcasts about writing, short informal writing assignments to prepare for the formal papers, and lots of opportunity to interact with your professor by email, phone, text-chat, or video-chat.

This is a general education course that fulfills the CA1 requirement. It also counts towards the American Studies and English majors. I see it as a great course for anyone who is interested in understanding why dystopian and apocalyptic novels, films, and TV shows are so popular in the 21st century while utopian texts have all but disappeared. 

 

ENGL 2730W: Travel Writing | Online Course  | Deans, Tom

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

Here’s the catalog description: Introduction to the craft of travel writing, with attention to the history, variety, and ethics of the genre. W and CA 1. But you deserve more detail: Travel writing is both a report of an unfamiliar place and a revelation of the self. We will explore this vibrant genre of non-fiction by reading a range of travel writing, most of it contemporary; you will also compose original essays grounded in your experiences. You don’t have to be journeying to exotic places during the course, but you do need to adopt the attitude of an explorer and storyteller, taking account of your travels (past or present) in either far-off or nearby locales--or in this strange year of covid-19, maybe even in your home. We will write 4 major essays: 1 critical analysis of published travel writing and 3 creative essays that report and reflect on your experiences. You will also select one of those essays to convert into another medium, such as a podcast, blog, illustrated narrative, or annotated map. All essays will be composed in drafts, with peer review. Other requirements include posting to discussion boards, completing quizzes, reviewing the drafts of others, and assembling a final portfolio. You can find the full syllabus here

ENGL 3503: Shakespeare I | Online Course | Bohlin, Reme

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

Summer Session 2: July 13 - August 14


ENGL 1616: Major Works of English & American Literature | Online Course | Reynolds, John

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

Literature of the Sea

From the early stories of Jonah and The Odyssey to the contemporary novels of Patrick O'Brian’s Aubrey-Maturin series, the sea story has been one of the most enduring and popular genres in literature.  What is it that makes for the sea story’s broad and lasting appeal? Why does the sea captivate so deeply the human heart and mind?  Herman Melville suggests that “meditation and water are wedded forever,” that “there is magic in it.” Undoubtedly the sea provides a vast and formidable stage upon which the dramas of self-discovery and social conflict can be imagined.

In this course, we will explore some of the major works in English and American drama, fiction, and poetry that focus on the human relationship to the sea and sea voyages; and, perhaps, through our investigation of these important authors and their works, we will come to understand more fully and clearly our human fascination with “the watery part of the world” (Melville). We will consider Samuel Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Herman Melville’s, “Benitio Cereno,” Jack London’s The Sea Wolf, Sara Orne Jewett’s The Country of Pointed Firs and Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea.  Course work will include discussion, a weekly journal, quizzes and an analytical essay.

 

ENGL 2049W: Writing Through Research | Online Course | Carillo, Ellen

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

Writing Through Research is intended for students in all majors and fulfills one of the W requirements at the University of Connecticut. The first part of the course is devoted to working together as a class on a research project on the subject of technology in order to practice the elements of research, including how to develop a research question, find sources to guide this exploration, engage sources, develop a first draft, and revise this draft. The rest of the course is devoted to applying this methodology. Students will develop and explore an individual research question relevant to them, which will culminate in a large-scale research paper.

Topics of previous research essays include:

  • The health risks associated with cell phone usage
  • The ethics of sex selection
  • The role of social programs in urban settings
  • The use of placebos in the medical field
  • The effect of fast-food on Americans
  • The place of authors’ diaries, personal letters, and notes in interpreting their
    literature

 

ENGL 2407: The Short Story | Online Course  | Codr, Dwight

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

This course is designed to introduce students to the short story as a literary form. The course, which includes short stories from a range of periods and authors, invites students to engage with these stories through formal writing assignments and discussion board posts. Students will also read theoretical texts and pieces of literary criticism, which they will apply to the assigned stories. 

 

ENGL 3122: Irish Literature in English Since 1939 | Online Course | Kervick, Mollie

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

Alternative Session 2: July 13 - August 21


ENGL 1012W: Business Writing I | Online Course | Bird, Trudi

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

 

ENGL 2627: Topics in Literary Studies | Online Course | Grossman, Leigh

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011

This course traces major themes and concepts in science fiction from the Golden Age writers of the 1930s, through the New Wave of the 1960s and 1970s, to the present day. Students will focus on works by Asimov, Card, Heinlein, LeGuin, and other writers—both well-known and forgotten—as well as their impact on the field. The development and impact of particular ideas in speculative fiction will be traced as well, along with the relationship of science fiction literature to other genres and other media, and the state of the SF publishing field today--including the dramatic editorial and demographic shifts of the last few years, and some of the most important current writers.


Summer Session 3: June 1 - August 28


ENGL 3091: Writing Internship | Hours Arranged | Fairbanks, Ruth

Prerequisite: ENGL 1007 and 1008 or 1010 or 1011 or 2011. Open to juniors or higher. Credit and hours by arrangement, not to exceed six credits per semester. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent required.

Writing Internships provide unique opportunities for students to write in non-academic settings in which they are supervised by professional writers. Internships are recognized as an important aspect of undergraduate education and many employers prefer applicants with internship experience. English majors have priority of choice for English 3091, but the course is open to students in other disciplines. Both on-campus and off-campus placements offering a wide variety of professional experiences are available. This is a variable-credit course, and students may elect from one to six credits of training. Grading is on the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory scale. The course may be repeated for credit with no more than eight credits per placement.

Placements have included Cashman & Katz Advertising, Connecticut Landmarks, Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, Globe Pequot Press, Legal Assistance Resource Center of Connecticut, The Dodd Research Center and Archive, Mystic Seaport, New Britain Museum of American Art, UConn Alumni Foundation, UConn School of Pharmacy, UConn Women’s Center, and Von der Mehden Development Office.  Many other placements are available.

Application materials are available here .